FY17 CLIP

FY17 CLIP

file:///C:/Users/HP/Downloads/FY17%20CLIP.pdf

Carroll County Schools
FY17 CLIP
Submission Date: July 20, 2016
Approval Date: August 16, 2016
1. Title I, Part A; Title I, Part C; Title I, Part D; Title II, Part A and Part D; Title III;
Title IV; IDEA; Perkins; EHCY
A description of the process the LEA used to determine the academic needs of its student body including the unique
needs of students served through each applicable federal program. An analysis of the results should be included.
School level administrators, intervention specialists, and counselors have been trained to use the Data Utilization
Tool. This tool allows state mandated test data to be analyzed both on a system level and a school level. System
strengths and weaknesses are determined in content areas and System Improvement Plans and
Professional Learning Plans are adjusted to reflect the needs of the system to improve student
achievement. School level personnel use data to determine trends in teaching and learning.
Professional learning needs are determined to address the weaknesses shown by the data.
Individual student strengths and weaknesses are determined all the way to the content
domains. Individual learning paths are created to address the needs of the students. To further
determine and describe specific student academic achievement needs, the Carroll County
School System also uses the following assessment tools: WIDA and ACCESS, Georgia
Kindergarten Inventory of Developing Skills (GKIDS), State checklist for Early Intervention
Program (EIP) Grades K-5, STAR Reading and Math, and Common Assessments for the Georgia
Standards of Excellence (GSE) are used to identify student mastery throughout the year.
Carroll County uses the assessment results to identify students with academic needs through
the SST process and progress monitoring tools. Additional specialized assessments are utilized
to ensure students receive the maximum supports necessary to address their educational
weaknesses. Assessments may include, Psychological/Academic Assessments completed by
School Psychologists, Speech & Language Assessments, Auditory Processing Evaluations,
Occupational/Physical Therapy Evaluations. Data gathered from these assessments help
identify gifted, English Learners, students with disabilities (SWD), reading and math
performance levels and progress in mastery of the curriculum. Information is also used to help
determine academic, developmental, and functional needs to develop IEPs or 504 Plans for
students with disabilities. Homeless students' academic needs are determined at the time of
identification. Counselors meet with the students and families to determine the needs of the
students. Test scores and previous academic progress are reviewed and referrals for expedited
evaluations are made as needed.
The Department of Teaching and Learning, under the direction of the Assistant
Superintendent, as well as schools, examines and disaggregates the system/school test
results. These results are printed on charts and displayed in the system and school level data
rooms. Presentations are also made to the School Board, the system leadership team, schools,
parents, school councils and the community. Information is also entered on the System's
Balanced Scorecard which is used to evaluate the system, schools, and the Superintendent.
Data can be found on the system website at www.carrollcountyschools. com and also through
an annual report by the Superintendent each school year.
Title I, Part A funds will be used based upon the comprehensive needs assessment conducted
by each Title I school in order to provide additional educational assistance to individual
students assessed as needing help in meeting the State's challenging student academic
achievement standards. Results from state mandated assessments will drive the uses of the
funds based upon the needs of the most at-risk students. Title I funds are used as follows:
Class-Size Reduction Teachers, Tutoring in Content Areas (students not meeting state
standards), supplemental supplies and manipulatives to improve student learning, content
specific computer software, technology, supplemental books, professional learning, stipends for
teachers working beyond their contracted hours, consultants to work with students and
teachers in content areas identified in the comprehensive needs assessment, and parental
involvement.
Scientifically-based research programs utilized in our system include Choosing the Best,
Bullying Prevention Program, and Peer Mediation. In the area of Career, Technical &
Agriculture Education (CTAE) the academic need of students is determined in several
ways. Each program has an advisory committee that meets at a minimum twice per year. A
major focus of the committee meeting is to identify and for instructors to remain current, on
key skill-sets needed by students to be successful in industry. Perkins funding may be utilized
to enhance technology or equipment in CTAE labs to support instructional efforts targeted at
these skill-sets. In addition, Perkins funding will also be utilized to meet the needs of special
populations. The Career & Technical Instruction (CTI) staff members attend IEP meetings to
identify and discuss unique needs of students with disabilities in CTAE programs. If needed,
Perkins funding will used to purchase equipment, curriculum or supplies to meet these needs.
IDEA funds will be used to address the specific specialized needs of students with disabilities
(SWD). A comprehensive review and needs assessment is conducted by Exceptional Children's
Services (ECS), Teaching and Learning and district administrators. Based on student
achievement levels, school/student needs and district instructional needs for addressing the
most at-risk learners allocation of funds are determined. IDEA funds are used in multiple
areas and are identified with descriptions in the district State Systemic Improvement PlanStudent
Success; Imagine the Possibilities (SSIP).
Needs Assessment and Planning
Carroll County Schools' stakeholders will participate and help identify specific needs for the
system and individual schools through the needs assessment process. Each school invites
stakeholders to include the above listed to participate in meetings planned to discuss
professional learning needs annually. The Title IIA Coordinator will require schools to submit
a copy of the agenda with sign-in sheets verifying that Professional Learning needs were
discussed with pertinent stakeholders.
A needs assessment for Carroll County Schools is conducted through an electronic Faculty,
Staff, and Administrators Survey for internal stakeholders and a Professional Learning Needs
Assessment Survey for our external stakeholders. Surveys are completed by teachers,
paraprofessionals, administrators, parents, community members, business partners, school
board members, a local technical college, and university. Each school discusses professional
learning needs with various stakeholders as they convene council meetings, leadership team
meetings, faculty meetings etc... with teachers, parents, community representatives at the
beginning of each year and periodically throughout the year. The needs assessment is
conducted in the spring of each year. The results of the surveys are used to identify the
professional learning needs of employees.
At the District Level, the Director of Federal Programs convenes an Annual Title I Meeting
where all parents and external stakeholders are invited to receive an overview of the
Comprehensive LEA Plan (CLIP). A separate input meeting is convened to afford all Title I
Parents and Stakeholders with an opportunity to provide input relative to the CLIP. District
Administrators/Supervisors, to include the Title IIA Coordinator, are invited to provide
information regarding the various federal programs included in the CLIP. The results of the
Faculty, Staff, and Administrator Survey are discussed with the parents and external
stakeholders. A document outlining the top prioritized needs based on the results of the
survey is shared and parents/external stakeholders are afforded the opportunity to provide
additional input regarding professional learning opportunities/needs for the system and
individual schools.
The Assistant Superintendent of Human Resources serves as a panel member for the
University of West Georgia's Educational Leadership Advisory Council where discussions of
professional learning for prospective teachers and leaders are discussed. The University of
West Georgia and Carroll County Schools use this council as a way to determine the
professional learning needs of the school system and the ways the university can assist the
school system in the area of professional learning. In addition, Georgia State University
provides professional learning for Special Education teachers.
The school system contracts with The Master Teacher Paraeducator Network in order to
provide professional learning for our paraprofessionals. This program is designed to ensure
that paraprofessionals are highly qualified and highly effective. The program is a flexible tool
for the school district to highly qualify, support, and provide professional learning and
continued education for the paraprofessionals.
Recruitment
Carroll County School System (CCSS) believes that getting the right people to fill positions is
the most critical HR management function undertaken. CCSS is committed to finding
motivated and qualified employees with diverse backgrounds to help achieve its purpose and
goals. The recruitment process begins by defining the job, seeking a pool of qualified
individuals, selecting the best individual for the position and finally orienting and inducting
the individual to the position and to Carroll County Schools.
CCSS funds several principals and assistant principals to attend job fairs. Recruiting
principals are provided a list of current vacancies and instructed to screen individuals for
certification and interest.
A Talent Management Dynamic Team was developed to study and define teacher essentials for
Carroll County and to discuss hiring practices. This committee has reviewed and is now
codifying and developing rubrics for the application process. Interview structures, behavioral
interviews and performance interviews. This team has delivered training to all leaders
responsible for hiring in the area of hiring highly qualified certified teachers and support staff.
CCSS contracted with an outside firm to address recruiting practices and to develop materials
to support recruiting efforts.
CCSS contracted with an individual to improve support provided to new teachers. We are
better planning for our Teacher Induction Program through surveys, standardizing our new
teacher mentor program, and providing guidance documents for on-going training and support
for new teachers. Vacancies are advertised on the Carroll County Schools' website and
TeachGeorgia.org. Interested applicants complete the online application to be considered for
employment within the system.
Retention
Over the past few years, the teacher retention rate has been moderately stable. Approximately
one to five percent of the teaching staff is replaced due to attrition. Teacher retention is
analyzed annually in order to determine if a particular school may be experiencing a high
teacher turnover. The Faculty, Staff, and Administrators Survey is designed to gather
information from teachers and other supporting staff in the area of retention.
A systemwide New Teacher Induction Program (TIP) is implemented prior to the beginning of
the school year. New teachers attend a two day session of purposeful break-out classes
conducted by system wide support staff. Special Education teachers attend a third day of
induction. District data reveals that retaining special education teachers continues to be an
area of concern/need. Steps are taken throughout the year to provide additional trainings and
opportunities for embedded professional learning to retain special education teachers. Critical
need fields, such as special education, continue to have a moderate turnover rate due to the
nature of addressing the challenges of the most at-risk learners. The Exceptional Children's
Services (ECS) department conducts both system-wide and specialized cluster meetings
throughout the district to support the needs of teachers, staff, in-school coordinators,
psychologists and speech pathologists in an effort to retain special education teachers and
staff. Specific supports are noted in SSIP.
Each school principal develops and implements an on-going orientation and induction program
for new teachers assigned to their school.
Professional Learning
The Carroll County School district strives to implement a district professional learning plan
that provides all employees with the learning opportunities necessary to equip them to support
high levels of learning for all students. Additionally, schools will provide opportunities for
professional learning to all staff, which will be outlined in the school improvement plan.
Three levels of Professional Learning will be provided:
1. District-wide initiatives. These are few in number and will be attended by all certified
staff, and non-certified staff when appropriate, over a defined time-span. They are
generally large-topic issues that pertain to all staff such as GSE, TKES, CCRPI,
Understanding Poverty, and Differentiated Instruction.
2. School-wide initiatives. These are few in number and are designed to address issues that
may not pertain to all school levels or groups. Examples might include guided reading,
Math Modeling, Understanding Poverty or Advanced Placement instruction.
3. Specific, department or individual needs. These are highly specific to one teacher or a
group of teachers within a school/district. They might include content-area work needed
by a teacher new to a course or to satisfy remediation needs or implementation of a
specific specialized program for a targeted group of learners. They may also include
opportunities for media specialists, counselors, special education staff, school
psychologists, speech-language pathologists and art or music teachers.
Professional learning, training, and planning should be addressed in the SIP and School Wide
Plan (SWP). The district-wide initiatives are valuable because they increase the value of
collaboration by providing a common language and a common set of experiences and
understanding for all staff. In addition, they align instruction and organization across gradelevels
and subject which makes it easier for students to transition from class to class or grade
to grade.
In order to best support and assist all staff members, professional learning should be jobembedded
and sustainable. It is highly recommended that every school and department
annually provide twenty hours of professional development to all staff members. This enables
certified staff and paraprofessionals to recertify with minimal intrusion on the instructional
program or personal time.
Prior to attending or registering for any professional learning activity, an electronic Professional
Learning Leave Request form must be submitted. All possible expenditures and funding source
must be entered on this form and submitted for PRIOR approval.
Class Size Reduction
Reducing class size is one of few educational strategies shown to increase learning and close
the achievement gap between students who are considered at-risk and high academically
achieving students. The Institute of Education Sciences concluded that class size reduction
was an evidence-based reform that has been proven to increase student achievement. At-risk
student performance (students from poor and minority backgrounds) improves the most.
Teachers are able to provide more individual instructional time with students with a lower
teacher/student ratio.
The teachers in Carroll County Schools will modify their instructional strategies due to smaller
class sizes by adjusting content coverage, grouping practices, and pedagogical strategies.
There will be less time disciplining students and more time working with at-risk students
academically. More time will be used during lessons to work with students individually which
is an important factor in promoting student achievement. In the smaller classroom setting,
the teachers will be able to spend more time teaching to small groups of two to four students
versus teaching to the whole class. Although the teachers will not change their teaching
strategies in totality, they will be able to spend less time on classroom management tasks such
as keeping students on task and disciplining. This results in teachers being able to
concentrate on instruction and identifying and meeting the needs of their at-risk students.
Not all research supports that students learn more in smaller classes, but most research
concludes that there is a direct correlation between small classes and improvements in student
achievement. Furthermore, reducing the number of students does not equate better learning.
The teachers in the Carroll County School System will alter their teaching practices using the
Class Size Reduction model which results in less lecture-style approaches and more frequent
feedback and interaction with students who are considered at-risk academically.
Non-HiQ Teachers and Paraprofessionals
At the beginning of each year and when preparing set asides for the consolidated application,
the Director of Federal Programs contacts the HR Department to obtain information regarding
the status of highly qualified teachers. This information is then used to determine the
professional learning set aside amount for high quality teachers. A request for lesser amounts
is typically submitted on the consolidated application. All teachers who are paid with Title I
funds are required to meet HIQ status. The Title IIA Coordinator sets aside funds to help
teachers meet HIQ status, if necessary.
Paraprofessionals are individuals that work in supervised non-instructional roles. In order to
meet the requirements as a paraprofessional:
· Two years of study at an accredited institution of higher learning approved by PSC must
be completed which includes 60 semester hours; or
· Hold an Associate's degree or higher; or
· Pass a PSC approved assessment designed in assisting instruction in core content areas.
Student achievement data to include results from locally developed benchmarks, CRCT, and
EOCT data is a major source utilized during the needs assessment. For FY16, the Georgia
Milestones will be used in the place of CRCT and EOCT data. System and School leaders also
use the results of the needs assessment survey as a source for the retention data and equity
data. The GAPSC website is a data source used by administrators to analyze the HiQ data for
teachers and paraprofessionals. Intervention Specialists complete a Principal/Coach Plan with
each of the Title I School Principals. The plan identifies standardized test data, teachers with
Professional Development Plans (PDPs), and Professional Learning Needs for the staff or
individual teachers. The plan includes a checklist of professional learning
activities/instructional strategies that the Intervention Specialists can provide.
Summary and Analysis of Needs
1. Needs Assessment: The school system will use multiple sources of data to determine
the Title II, Part A funded activities. Student achievement data, faculty/staff survey data
(professional learning and perception), retention data, teacher evaluation data, and leadership
development observation/evaluations will all be used to identify the needs of the school
system. The Intervention Specialists, ECS Coordinators and Instructional Facilitators will
provide information relative to teacher quality and effectiveness as they participate in
classroom observations throughout the year.
2. Identification of Activities: Once the school system determines the needs relative to
teacher and principal quality and effectiveness, research based activities and initiatives will be
developed in order to meet the specific needs.
3. Data Collection: Georgia Milestones and Georgia Alternate Assessment data will be
collected to identify the content teachers needing professional learning and support; the
results of the faculty/staff surveys and TKES will be reviewed to determine the professional
learning needs and specific areas of focus to address teacher quality and effectiveness;
retention data will be reviewed to determine the topics for the teacher induction, orientation,
and mentoring programs; student achievement data, faculty/staff survey data, and LKES will
be used to determine the principal's needs.
4. Data Collector/Review and Analysis Coordination: The student achievement data will
be collected, disaggregated, and analyzed by the Department of Teaching and Learning. The
results of the Faculty/Staff Survey will be reviewed by school and district level administrators
to determine the needs of the teachers. TKES observation records will be monitored by the
building level administrator and the Assistant Superintendent of Human Resources in order to
determine teacher quality/effectiveness and professional learning needs. Retention data will
be reviewed by the Assistant Superintendent of Human Resources, Superintendent, Assistant
Superintendent of Teaching and Learning and Director of Exceptional Children's Services to
determine the effectiveness of induction, orientation, and mentoring. The Superintendent and
Assistant Superintendent of Human Resources will monitor the effectiveness and professional
development of the Principals based upon the LKES observation records, student achievement
data, and the results of the Faculty/Staff Survey.
5. Timeline: Some of the data will be reviewed in the spring of each year to determine the
initiatives and activities to be implemented in the following year (Georgia Milestones, Georgia
Alternate Assessment, Survey Data, and Retention Data). Student achievement data, HQ
Remediation Plans, TKES documentation, and LKES documentation will be reviewed on an ongoing
basis. At the end of the year, all of the data mentioned above will be reviewed to
determine the effectiveness of the title II, Part A funded activity.
Prioritized List of Title II, Part A Funding Needs for FY17
Based upon the needs assessment completed using FY16 Georgia Milestones Data, FY16
Georgia Alternate Assessment, Benchmark Data, Retention Data, TKES Data, and System
Survey Data the following prioritized list will be implemented using Title II, Part A funds: Class
Size Reduction Teachers; Consultants to work with New Principals, Leadership Teams, and
provide Professional Learning; Teacher Induction Program; Curriculum Review and Planning;
Instructional Technology Specialist; Gifted Endorsements; Communication to Parents about
the Qualifications of Teachers. If funding allows, collegial planning, book studies, substitutes
for PL, travel and registration for PL will also be included in the Title II, Part a Budget.
The Professional Learning Needs that will be addressed in the Title II, Part A budget include
teacher development, leader development, and professional growth. The Personnel Needs that
will be addressed in the Title II, Part A budget include teacher and leader retention and teacher
effectiveness and experience. Class Size Reduction Teachers will be utilized to address the
factors that impact the learning and work environment.
Equity Interventions
The Equity Interventions that Carroll County Schools will focus on in FY17 are embedded in
the FY17 LEA Equity Action Plan and also attached to the CLIP. The two program components
that the school system will prioritize funding for include Personnel and Professional Learning.
In the area of Personnel, Support the Retention of Effective School Leaders is the intervention
of focus. For Professional Learning, Offering Professional Growth Opportunities Designed to
Produce Teachers and/or School Leaders Prepared to Promote the Success of All Students is
the targeted intervention.
Summary of Results and Analysis of LEA's FY17 Title II, Part A Needs
Student Achievement
The Carroll County School District uses a coordinated and aligned strategic improvement
process to drive improvement at the district and school levels. This process allows for both
strategic and operational improvement efforts in the same planning effort. The process
should be consistent and pervasive across all parts of the organization. The four major
components of the strategic improvement process are:
 Aligned and nested school improvement plans (SIP's)
 Balanced Scorecards for each school and the district aligned to the SIP
 Continual use of formative and summative data
 Annual Reports of Progress to stakeholders
The strategic improvement planning process follows a cycle of events to support the four
main components outlined above. Although the activities of the cycle are grouped into four
sections, it is important to note that there are overlaps between the four sections. In
addition, activities may be moved forward or back to meet specific needs.
The school system will use multiple sources of data to determine the Title II, Part A funded
activities. Student achievement data (primarily Georgia Milestones Assessments, Local
Common Assessments, and data from academic software programs) is among the data
analyzed to determine the needs of students and the professional learning opportunities
made available for our teachers and principals. The Department of Teaching and Learning
reviews the above data and the Faculty, Staff, and Administrator Survey to determine
professional learning needs. Based upon the most recent survey which was completed in
March of 2016 to inform the FY17 school year, the following PL was identified by the school
system stakeholders: Acceleration, Best Practices (Instructional), Classroom Management,
Closing the Achievement GAP, Collegial Planning, Differentiation, Google Classroom,
Illuminate, RTI, and Standards of Mathematical Practice.
Professional Learning Needs
Teacher Development-- Three levels of Professional Learning will be provided in Carroll
County Schools.
1. District-wide initiatives. The district will outline these initiatives in its professional
learning plan and will guide and support schools in planning aligned learning
opportunities.
2. School-wide initiatives. These are school wide specific issues based on data
analysis and a professional learning audit each year. Examples might include
literacy instruction, assessment practices, student engagement or student
advisement.
3. Department or individual needs initiatives. These are specific to one teacher or a
group of teachers within a school. They might include content-area work needed
by a teacher new to a course or to satisfy remediation needs. They may also
include opportunities for media specialists, counselors, and art or music teachers.
Professional learning will be either planned through the school improvement process or
just in time based on needs that arise during the year. Professional learning, training, and
planning should be addressed in the School Improvement Plan as part of the professional
learning plan. The district-wide initiatives are valuable because they increase the value
of collaboration by providing a common language and a common set of experiences and
understanding for all staff. In addition, they align instruction and organization across
grade-levels and subject which makes it easier for students to transition from class to class
or grade to grade.
In order to best support and assist all staff members, professional learning should be jobembedded
and sustainable. It is highly recommended that every school and department
annually provide professional development to all staff members. This enables certified
staff and paraprofessionals to recertify with minimal intrusion on the instructional
program or personal time.
The TKES Evaluation Instrument, the Faculty, Staff, and Administrator Survey, and
Student Achievement Data are used to determine the PL needs of the teachers. Based upon
the above instruments, a Professional Learning Plan is created that includes initiatives,
goals, TKES Standard alignment, PL activities/methods, an evaluation component, and the
resources used to satisfy the initiative. Professional Learning Days were included in the
Instructional Calendar for principals to provide teacher development opportunities. If
adequate FY17 Title II, Part A funds are available, each school will receive what we call
"Cluster Professional Learning Funds". The principal will submit a proposal to the Title II,
Part A Coordinator for his/her school or cluster of schools (feeder pattern: elementary,
middle, and high school). Included in the proposal are the initiatives based upon either the
school or the cluster's needs assessment. The activities that can be supported with these
funds relative to teacher development include but is not limited to the following: book
studies, collegial planning, registration/travel/hotel accommodations for PL activities,
stipends for PL above and beyond their contracted hours.
Leader Development-Principal retention rate is a determining factor of the needs
assessment conducted by the Human Resources Department to determine the support
provided for new principals. Each principal's leadership evaluation is used to determine
the PL opportunities for the school leaders. Student achievement data, perception data
(embedded in the Faculty, Staff, and Administrator Survey), and leadership evaluations are
used to determine the professional learning needs of the leaders in the school system.
Professional Growth-student achievement is a factor that has a strong correlation
with professional growth. Title II, Part A funds are used to reimburse teachers as they pass
the GACE based upon the needs assessment of the qualifications of teachers. The Teaching
and Learning Department reviews student achievement data and the needs of the students
to determine the number of teachers allowed to pursue gifted endorsement opportunities.
2
As a support of the principal retention rate, an Aspiring Leaders Program is available to
provide professional growth to teachers in the area of leadership as they aspire to become
school and district leaders. Although the principal turnover rate is a result of principals
retiring, the needs assessment reveals a need to provide professional learning opportunities
and a structured program for aspiring administrators
Private School Professional Learning-Carroll County Schools does not have any
private schools within the geographic area that participate in any of the federal programs
available in the school system. A needs assessment of their PL would be conducted should
they decide to participate in our federal programs. Certified letters are mailed to them in
the fall and spring outlining the various federal programs available for their school's
participation.
Personnel Needs
Teacher and Leader Recruitment-The Assistant of Human Resources maintains a
list of employees leaving the school system for reasons such as resignation and retirement.
Based upon those vacancies and new positions that may be added, the Assistant
Superintendent of Human Resources provides Principals with an opportunity to post
teacher positions. For Principals and Assistant Principal vacancies, the Human Resources
Department posts vacancies. The Carroll County School System funds teacher recruitment
by sending Principals to various recruitment fairs. The Assistant of Human Resources
determines the needs based upon content, grade level, schools, experience, and student
needs (EL, Gifted, Special Education).
Teacher and Leader Retention-As stated previously, the teacher retention rate has
been reasonably stable. Approximately one to five percent of the teaching staff is replaced
due to attrition. Teacher retention is analyzed annually in order to determine if a particular
school may be experiencing a high teacher turnover. The Faculty, Staff, and
Administrators Survey is the tool used to obtain pertinent information from teachers and
other supporting staff in the area of retention. New Teachers have an opportunity to
participate in the Teacher Induction Program which provides a two to three days training
for new teachers prior to the academic school year and ongoing training continuing at the
school level for the remainder of the year. Principals have been encouraged to pair their
new teachers with a mentor in order to provide support in the areas of need or concern.
Teacher Experience and Effectiveness-TKES Evaluation and student achievement
data are reviewed to determine the experience and effectiveness of classroom teachers.
Based upon the analysis of the data, professional learning opportunities are designed at
both the school level and district level to address deficiencies, opportunities, and classroom
supports. Intervention Specialists provide support to teachers who may be struggling in
the classroom and provides coaching in areas based upon the needs assessment.
3
Factors that Impact the Learning and Work Environment
Class Size-Principals review student achievement data and enrollment in order to
determine whether or not to reduce class size in each of their schools. As stated previously,
reducing class size is one of few educational strategies shown to increase learning and close
the achievement gap between students who are considered at-risk and high academically
achieving students. This strategy will be employed by schools in FY17 using Title I, Part A
and Title II, Part A funds. In order to determine the effectiveness of the Class Size
Reduction teacher in each of the schools, student assessment data will be used to
determine the impact.
School Climate-The Faculty, Staff, and Administrators Survey is analyzed to
determine the climate or perception of the students, parents, and school staff. The
Department of Teaching and Learning reviews the data to determine the schools who will
receive supplemental support due to the school climate. A review of the data takes place
during July and August. A school visit's log is maintained Google Drive and all Teaching
and Learning Directors/Coordinators provide notes outlining their support provided or
observations during their visits.
Title II, Part A Grants Administration
Georgia Milestones data, teacher and leader retention, and the Faculty, Staff, and
Administrators Survey will be used to determine the use of Title II, Part A funds. For FY17,
the Carroll County School System will continue to use Title II funds to support new
Principals and Assistant Principals relative to leader retention. Opportunities for content
teachers to become more effective in the classroom will be explored as District and School
Level Administrators seek scientifically researched based professional learning activities.
Again, Class Size Reduction teachers will be funded as a means for teacher to modify their
instructional strategies and meet the needs of their students more effectively in small
classroom settings. A Teacher Induction Program (TIP) will be funded to support efforts
with teacher retention by providing new teachers with pertinent information relative to the
school system, the schools, and the students that they will serve. Stipends will be provided
to teachers who participate in professional learning opportunities above and beyond their
teaching contracted hours. Consultants will be used to support and provide professional
learning for teachers, principals, and school leaders in areas/topics established through
the needs assessment.
4
2. Title I, Part A; Title I, Part C; Title I, Part D; Title II, Part D; Title III; IDEA;
EHCY
A description of high-quality student academic assessments that the LEA and schools
will use:
a. To determine the success of children in meeting the State student academic
achievement standards, and to provide information to teachers, parents, and
students on the progress being made toward meeting the State student
academic achievement standards;
b. To assist in diagnosis, teaching, and learning in the classroom in ways that best
enable low-achieving children served under applicable federal programs to meet
State student achievement academic standards and do well in the local
curriculum;
c. To determine what revisions are needed to projects so that such children meet
the State student academic achievement standards;
d. To effectively identify students who may be at risk for reading failure or who
are having difficulty reading, through the use of screening, diagnostic, and
classroom-based instructional reading assessments;
The school system uses a number of high quality academic assessments in addition to
those identified by the state to determine students' success in meeting the State student
academic achievement standards. These various assessments provide information to
teachers, parents, and students on the progress being made toward meeting the state
student academic achievement standards. The Director of Federal Programs collaborates
with the Homeless Liaison to ensure that students experiencing homelessness are included
in the various high quality academic assessments identified by the state. Following is a list
of assessments used to determine the level of student performance: EOG, EOG and GAA
student data, online common assessment for district (Illuminate), Computerized Programs
(Compass, USA Test Prep, STAR Reading & Math, Accelerated Reading & Math Cornerstone
Skills Tutor, Study Island, Fast Forward), Benchmark Tests, Teacher-made Tests, EL/ESOL
Testing (ACCESS and W-APT), teacher generated rubrics for performance/projects, DRA
(Reading level), Running Records (Reading Miscues), checklists, State writing assessments
rubrics, Lexile, Reading Counts, goal and objective mastery for students with disabilities
and Progress Monitoring through RTI. Following is a list of how the results of assessments
are used: Teachers use the previous year's EOC/EOG/GAA data and writing assessment
roster results from his/her class to evaluate strengths and weaknesses in the instructional
program and to evaluate strengths and weaknesses of individual students. DIBELS, STAR
(Reading & Math), Reading Counts, Lexile, Compass Learning Assessments, and Study
Island assessments provide the reading and math levels of students and are helpful in
planning a course of instruction for the student. Assessments also determine whether or
not revisions should be made to instruction and/or projects and assignments. Ongoing
assessments help teachers plan more effectively and dictate what changes need to be made
in order for the student/s to meet the standards. State assessment results are analyzed to
determine content domain strengths and weaknesses and provide the teacher with a basis
for making any type of revisions or changes in instruction and unit plans. Following is a list
of assessments used to identify students who have difficulty reading: Lexile, STAR Reading,
Reading Counts, DRA, Running Records, Previous State assessment results, and Student
work samples. District common assessments and benchmark tests are used to measure
success of students mastering state standards. Teacher-made tests for formative
5
assessment also drive the data look down to the classroom/teacher level. To track student
mastery of these assessments down to the standard, Carroll County uses Illuminate, which
tracks student progress over time. Standards that show low mastery are retaught within a
class while students who struggle with individual standards are re-taught in tutoring
groups, specialized instruction groups such as special education and extended learning
time (ELT).
Additionally, the Home Language Survey is used to identify students that will be tested for
the ESOL Program. System enrollment forms include questions such as: What was the first
language the student learned to speak? What languages are spoken in the student's home?
What language does the student speak most often? If the answer to any of the three
questions is not "English" or a language in addition to English is provided, the student is
referred to the ESOL teacher(s) for further evaluation. If needed, as determined by the
screening, the student is placed in ESOL program.
Results of these assessments are shared with parents during parent conferences, with
individual student assessment profile sheets, RTI meetings. IEP meetings and/or other
meetings to convey individual and group results. Administrators, Special Education
Instructional Facilitators, Coordinators, and Intervention Specialists are trained to use the
data utilization tool in order to thoroughly analyze the school data. Test data are shared
with all stakeholders in a variety of ways. The Assistant Superintendent of Teaching and
Learning presents the data and system initiatives to School Board Members and
Administrators. Principals share this data with teachers, parents, and other stakeholders.
The Superintendent publishes the data in an Annual Report. This report is disseminated to
local businesses, local newspapers, and the Chamber of Commerce. Both the
Superintendent and Assistant Superintendent share the data by speaking to local civic
organizations and community groups. Schools display their data in a prominent locationData
Rooms for all staff, students, and visitors to review. Student progress is shared at
PTO/PTA meetings, school council meetings, Annual Cluster meetings, Annual Title IA
Meetings, Parental Involvement Workshops, and in system/school newsletters.
3. Title I, Part A; Title I, Part C; Title I, Part D; IDEA; EHCY
A description of how the LEA will participate, if selected, in the State National
Assessment of Educational Progress in 4th and 8th grade reading and mathematics of
the National Education Statistics Act of 1994 and how the results will be used in the
local educational agency.
When requested, the Carroll County School system participates in the National Assessment
of Educational Progress (NAEP). Information compiled from NAEP assessment is used to
compare system level achievement with national rankings. Information from the NAEP
website contains helpful information for instruction. This information will be used to help
teachers write good assessments. Students with disabilities, ELTPC, and 504 Plans have
appropriate assessment accommodations made on all norm referenced tests. NAEP
determines the grade level and the content to be tested. All students (to include
homeless) in that specific grade level will be tested in the specified content area.
6
4. Title II, Part D; E-Rate
A description of strategies to share system progress, disseminate evaluation results,
encourage broad stakeholder involvement, and market the role technology can have
in helping students achieve in innovative ways.
TECHNOLOGY MISSION AND VISION
Mission: The Carroll County Schools Technology Plan is an effort to ensure that all
students and teachers have access to and use technology as a tool for learning,
communication, and collaboration. Engaging students in meaningful learning, which
involves challenging, authentic experiences using technology, is embedded in Carroll
County Schools' mission is to develop globally competitive, college and career graduates.
Professional development to support teachers with integrating technology and curriculum
to meet instructional goals is a key component of this plan. As the system moves toward
meeting the goals of this plan, all stakeholders will become more invested in technology and
its benefits.
Vision: Educators must be proactive in their approach to preparing students for success
in the twenty-first century. Instructional designs must include the concept of preparing
students for technologies not yet invented. Therefore, technology is not only a tool to
facilitate the quality and excellence of the students, faculty, and staff, but also an abstract
concept that must be developed in the minds of all stakeholders, including community and
parent partners. Technology should not be thought of as a separate entity, but instead an
integral tool used in the classroom to individualize, enhance, and motivate student
learning. Technology should support learning in the classroom, preparing students
through authentic experiences for the real world. Integration of technology is the inclusion
by teachers and students of appropriate technology that facilitates, individualizes,
enhances, and enriches teaching and learning of state and local curricula. The professional
development and training of all faculty and staff is an essential cornerstone to the success
of Carroll County Schools' mission.
The ultimate goal of Carroll County Schools' technology program is to increase various
aspects of student achievement and teacher performance. For this goal to be achieved,
there must be modern technology available to make a difference, teachers must be
appropriately trained to use that technology, and technology must be integrated into the
curriculum and classroom activities. To support technology goals, the school system
provides or maintains the following specific areas:
● A secure Google Site for storing and disseminating assessment data from the central
office to school administrators.
● A secure Teaching and Learning Site for disseminating information and housing
documents for certified staff.
● A secure Leadership Site for disseminating information to school administrators.
● Create and maintain Google Groups for content and grade level specific areas for
teacher collaboration.
● Network infrastructure is completed in twenty-five school sites spread throughout the
county. Network infrastructure with access to the Internet in each classroom and
administrative office is established to support classroom instruction and improve
student achievement.
● Adequate computer labs in schools and computers in all classrooms and
administrative offices will be networked within each facility.
7
● An increased focus on using technology to assist the school system in a "paperless"
approach to administrative tasks, professional learning, and recruitment and hiring
processes is in place.
● All teachers and administrators have web based e-mail and unlimited file storage
capabilities through Google Drive.
● Wireless access points are being installed in each classroom instructional area at
each school to support online learning and the growing usage of mobile devices.
● Appropriate hardware and software and assistive technology for special education
students will be made available in all schools.
● Additional technologies, i.e., graphing calculators, interactive boards, LCD
projectors, and curriculum presentation systems for mathematics and science
classrooms, will be provided throughout the system.
● Learning platforms for student and teacher online learning will be evaluated and
added so that courses will be available online within the school system. In
addition to full use of Georgia Virtual School, Carroll County Schools contracts
with Virtual High School and Edgenuity to offer online student courses and credit
recovery. Additionally, some of the technology courses in high school are
migrating to Internet based formats as opposed to textbooks and paper pencil
courses.
● The school system has implemented a new financial and personnel management
system called Infinite Visions with the objective of an integration with its student
information system and other system resources.
● The school system will continue to maintain existing handheld devices and seek to
evaluate and utilize emerging technologies for mobile learning.
● The school system will seek to expand its instructional technology support by
implementing and training school based support leaders.
● The school system utilizes Infinite Campus as its student information
system. Through this system, a parent portal is available so that parents and
students may have access to their school records and information. Infinite
Campus includes a reporting feature that maintains records of parent and student
use.
● Infinite Campus includes the ability for teachers to post syllabi, class schedules,
grades, calendar information, and the ability to link to teacher websites. An
automated calling system is used to notify parents of absences or important
messages.
● High school student registration is facilitated through Infinite Campus, and all
high schools are migrating to use of this technology for developing master
schedules.
● The school system reviews hardware and software for purchase in order to
improve integration into the classroom by providing standardized training and
more efficient support.
● Members of Exceptional Children's Services are assigned to identify and support
teachers and students in using instructional and assistive technology. Members
of the technology team work closely with teachers to provide additional support as
necessary.
● Additional technology is provided for special education students through the use
of IDEA funds to have one-on-one access with the use of various types of
technology. This enable students to have easy access to specialized instructional
web-based programs as well as differentiated activities based on goals and
objectives for the individual student with special education staff support.
8
● In an effort to provide more opportunity for community input and awareness, the
school system utilizes E-board Technology. This has enabled the system in
moving toward technology based, paperless preparation for board meetings.
● All schools have websites that are linked to the school system website, and this
facilitates student, parent, and community input. Occasionally, surveys are
posted on the websites to gather additional input in specific areas of interest.
● Technology specialists assigned throughout the system will provide technical
assistance and support at all school sites. The Chief Technology Officer, and the
System Network Coordinator and the System Network Administrator maintain
system-level systems such as the school servers, email administration, firewall, and
content filters.
● Students will be taught computer skills at an early age and progress through a
sequence of computer skills needed to function in today's society as defined by the
Technology Integration Standards found in the Georgia Standards of Excellence.
● Students will be taught appropriate online behavior and Internet Safety through
advisement lessons. Students will be monitored using an approved technology
protection measure.
● The State of Georgia is migrating toward all standardized assessments being
administered and taken online in the near future. Carroll County Schools started this
process in the spring of 2015. Each school will be supported in testing 100% online
for the FY 17 school year.
Carroll County Schools is striving to provide the essential technology resources for the
students and staff members in the schools in an effort to prepare all students to compete in
a technological and global society.
5. Title I, Part A; Title I, Part C; Title II, Part D; Title III; IDEA
A description of how the LEA will provide additional educational assistance to
individual students assessed as needing help in meeting the State's challenging
student academic achievement standards. The description must include the
following:
a. Specific mention of disadvantaged students, migrant students, limited English
proficient students, and students with disabilities.
b. Specific steps the LEA will take to ensure that all students and teachers have
increased access to technology.
c. Specific steps on how the LEA will utilize available funds to support after school
programs (including before and after school and summer school) and schoolyear
extension programs.
Data is disaggregated by the system and schools to enable teachers and administrators to
identify areas of strength and weakness in instruction as well as identify students needing
specific help (economically disadvantaged, migrant students, EL, and students with
disabilities) to either meet or exceed standards. Many strategies are used to ensure that the
needs of all students are met. Upon identification, migrant children will be evaluated to
determine appropriate academic needs/placement. If identified for additional services, a
referral is made to the individual school's Student Support Team for support.
9
System strategies include continuous data disaggregation of system/state test results.
Intervention Specialists, Coordinators, and Instructional Facilitators help guide data
disaggregation at the school level in elementary and middle schools. At the high school
level, Counselors, Coordinators, Instructional Facilitators, and Graduation Facilitators
work with at-risk students to meet the requirements for graduation.
Student longitudinal test data is available through the Georgia Department of Education's
State Longitudinal Data System (SLDS) and Infinite Campus. Teachers of record and
administrators have a password to access and create individual student learning paths.
After/during school tutoring as well as extended day services for SWD is available at all
schools and funded with various resources such as: Title I funds, Title III, LEP and
Immigrant funds, IDEA and state extended day funds. Summer school sessions are
available for high school students to recover credit. Credit recovery is available at the high
schools through GA Virtual School, Virtual High School, and Edgenuity year round. Small
Learning Communities were created to provide credit recovery accrual.
All elementary schools utilize Accelerated Reader to strengthen vocabulary skills,
comprehension and fluency. ESOL teachers work with identified students in Grades K - 12
to improve language acquisition. In addressing the needs of elementary special needs
students a research based approach (e.g. Orton-Gillingham, SRA reading mastery) to
reading will be utilized to ensure fidelity to instruction in providing specialized reading
support. District sub-group data supports the need of a specialized reading approach that
will address gaps/weaknesses in reading skills. This will provide additional reading
support outside of the instruction provided through the general education classroom.
Implementation of this instructional practices is monitored by ECS staff, in-school
coordinators and building level administrators A lead Special Education teacher (In-School
Coordinator, ISC) is designated in each school to help coordinate special education related
services, supports and issues to address the challenging student academic achievement
standards. They are instrumental in working with each school's teachers, staff and building
level administration to ensure compliant practices as it relates to special education.
Responsibilities of the ISC also include working with district staff, building level testing
coordinators, RTI teams and a liaison for parents in addressing concerns. Students with
disabilities (SWD) receive individualized instruction as determined by the IEP through the
continuum of services to ensure instruction is provided in the least restrictive environment.
Inclusive models of instruction, including co-teaching and support services, are
implemented across all grade levels. Special Education Coordinators and Instructional
Facilitators are used system-wide to assist special education teachers and general
education teachers who teach SWD. Extended School Year (ESY) Services are funded by
IDEA and provide needed services as determined by the IEP. SWD are provided
opportunities to preview, scaffold, and accelerate content in the general curriculum. Three
Intervention Specialists serve all middle schools and elementary schools. They disaggregate
data, help teachers build instructional units, differentiate curriculum for students, and
design assessments for benchmarking the system curriculum.
Special Education teachers are included in system-wide professional learning opportunities
and utilize the same GSE units as their counterparts in general education with a focus on
pre-requisite skills to the standards. Special Education Teachers of Intellectually Disabled
Students (MOID, SID, and PID) are trained on GSE and provide access to these students
through the GAA (Georgia Alternative Assessment). Professional learning for effective
10
collaborative teaching strategies is offered to teachers at all schools throughout the year to
maximize access to the general curriculum for students with disabilities. Training on
determining the least restrictive environment for all students is provided through
professional learning opportunities at system-wide meetings, cluster meetings and itinerant
staff meetings (speech-language pathologists, psychologists, hearing and vision teachers).
Intervention Specialists, Special Education Coordinators, and Instructional Facilitators also
provide research-based professional learning to school staff based on individual school
needs and initiatives. Specialized support through contractual consultants is utilized to
provide additional training and on-site support to address specific school and teacher
needs in addressing instruction for SWD.
The system technology plan directs the implementation of upgrades and replacements. The
system and schools' websites gives up-to-date information concerning all aspects of
curriculum, instruction, school improvement, test data, student services, transportation,
human resources, etc. Title I and Title IIA funds are used to reduce class size. General and
Special Education teachers have access to specialized instructional and Assistive
Technology (AT) and training in the use of Assistive Technology. Technology is readily
available to students with disabilities by providing additional tools and devices in an effort
to provide one-on-one access to address individualized student needs. The additional
purchase of technology from IDEA funds to provide further access to web-based programs
and differentiated content material provides teachers with leveled instructional tools as
outlined in SSIP. All teachers have ongoing professional learning opportunities to help
students learn through technology and the World Wide Web. Utilization of the Instructional
Services Coordinator, as well as the ECS Instructional Facilitator for each school provides
current and on-going support in addressing the needs of the most at-risk learners.
Extended School Year (ESY) is provided to SWD who meet the minimum criteria in an effort
to maintain a critical point of instruction and/or address skill deficits as determined by the
IEP team. Summer sessions are used to address grades K-12. Individual extensions are
available at other various times throughout the school year based on individual student/s
needs as determined by the IEP team.
Title I, Part A funds will be used based upon the comprehensive needs assessment
conducted by each Title I school in order to provide additional educational assistance to
individual students assessed as needing help in meeting the State's challenging student
academic achievement standards. Results from state mandated assessments will drive the
uses of the funds based upon the needs of the most at-risk students. Title I funds are used
as follows: Class-Size Reduction Teachers, Tutoring in Content Areas (students not
meeting state standards), supplemental supplies and manipulatives to improve student
learning, content specific computer software, technology, supplemental books, professional
learning, stipends for teachers working beyond their contracted hours, consultants to work
with students and teachers in content areas identified in the comprehensive needs
assessment, and parental involvement.
Title III funds are used to provide additional support such as after-school or summer
tutoring for ESOL students in order to further increase English proficiency and increase
student achievement in the core academic areas.
IDEA funds will be used based upon the comprehensive needs assessment conducted by
Exceptional Children's Services, Teaching and Learning and district/school administrators
11
in order to provide additional educational assistance to individual students assessed as
needing help in meeting the State's challenging student academic achievement standards.
Specific areas of need are addressed in the district State Systemic Improvement PlanStudent
Success; Imagine the Possibilities (SSIP).
6. Professional Learning; Title I, Part A; Title I, Part C; Title II, Part A; Title II,
Part D; Title III; Title VI, Part B; IDEA
A description of the strategy the LEA will use to coordinate programs under Titles I,
II, III, IV, VI, Part B, Perkins, and IDEA to provide professional learning on the
integration of technology into the curriculum and instruction to improve and support
teaching, learning, and technology literacy. The description should include
purchasing technology, available technology tools, distance learning opportunities,
and professional learning for teachers, administrators, pupil services personnel, any
other staff, and parents.
The ultimate goal of Carroll County Schools' technology program is to increase various
aspects of student achievement and teacher performance. For this goal to be achieved,
there must be enough technology available to make a difference, teachers must be
adequately trained to use that technology, and technology must be integrated into the
curriculum and classroom activities. The coordination/integration of the following federal
programs ensure that school needs are met in the area of technology and technology
professional learning opportunities: Title I, Part A, School Improvement Grants 1003(a),
Title II, Part A, Title II, Part D, Title III, Carl B. Perkins, and IDEA. Title I, Part A funds will
be used to purchase supplemental technology for schools based upon the academic needs
of the most at-risk students. Title I Principals will use scientifically based research when
making decisions pertaining to the purchases of technology, technology tools, and
professional learning opportunities for their core content staff. National studies have
revealed that students with access to technology show achievement gains on state
mandated assessments.
Network access to the Internet in each classroom and administrative office is established to
support classroom instruction and improve student achievement. Internet access is
provided through a wide area fiber network connected to our schools for the purpose of
establishing improved connectivity to all sites. Adequate computer labs in schools and
computers in all classrooms and administrative offices are networked within each facility.
All teachers and administrators have e-mail capabilities. Appropriate hardware and
software for all students in the general education and special education setting are made
available in all schools. Additional small technologies, i.e., graphing calculators and
interactive media boards, are provided throughout the system.
Technology specialists are assigned throughout the system to provide technical assistance
and support at all school sites. The Chief Technology Officer, System Network Coordinator
and the System Network Administrator maintain system level systems such as the school
servers, firewall, and content filters. Software is selected to assist instructional needs and
to promote student achievement in content areas. The emphasis of adoption of curricular
12
software corresponds to the textbook adoption cycle; however, software is continually
reviewed to ensure current programs are available to all teachers and students. Students
are taught computer skills at an early age and progress through a sequence of computer
skills needed to function in today's society as defined by the Technology Integration
Standards found in the Georgia Standards of Excellence.
IDEA will ensure Assistive Technology (AT) is provided to students with disabilities (SWD)
as identified in the students' IEP. Two staff members from the Exceptional Children's
Services Department are extensively involved with the GA Project for Assistive Technology
(GPAT). Assistive technology devices and software are made available to students as
determined by the IEP team. Professional learning is provided to regular and special
education staff on a regular basis involving AT implementation and needs for students with
disabilities. In an effort to provide evolving innovative practices one Instructional Facilitator
from Exceptional Children's services will provide support involving utilizing technology for
students with disabilities in the general education classrooms through co-teaching and
support services models. Web-based programs will be used to address specific populations
such as students with Autism and students with behavioral challenges beginning FY17.
Programs implemented will address academic needs, behavioral support and
social/emotional content through social skills training. Special education teachers will be
trained on the implementation of the programs to gain optimal student gain and provide
support to parents for utilization at home. The training of employees to use instructional
technology effectively is an ongoing process and is essential to meet the Special Georgia
Teacher Certification Requirements. The Carroll County School System uses system
employees, West Georgia RESA, contracted services, and the University of West Georgia, to
provide training. All instructional and administrative staff are trained in the use of
technology and are assisted in the use of technology in the classroom. Carroll County
Schools is striving to provide the essential technology resources for the students and staff
members in the schools in an effort to prepare all students to compete in a technological
and global society. System information software from Infinite Campus was implemented in
FY07. Carroll County School System offers a variety of distance learning opportunities for
students. Approved high school online vendors include Georgia Virtual School; Virtual High
School; and Class.com. The school system offers internet-based computer programs for
instruction and credit recovery, i.e., COMPASS Learning (K-8) and) Edgenuity (Secondary).
Additionally, an innovative instructional approach using telecommunications.
Instructional Uses of Technology
The Carroll County School System provides hardware and software necessary for students
to access the curriculum. Additionally, software and coursework to support online learning
and credit recovery is available for students. Tools such as Edgenuity, Georgia Virtual
School and Virtual High School are available for student use. The Google Apps for
Education Suite is being widely used allowing students and teachers increased
opportunities for collaboration. Specific technology needs for special education students
and staff will continue to be met. Based on the system-wide initiatives of implementing the
13
GSE and increasing the number of students receiving services in the general education
environment, specific software and hardware is provided for students with disabilities.

▪ Students have access to word prediction/text reader as determined by their IEPs.
▪ Middle School and High School students with disabilities have access to stand alone
word processors and tablets.
▪ Students with physical disabilities have access to computer technology, notebook
computers and software that can be accessed across school and home environments
as appropriate.
▪ All students have access to an advanced reading aid through Kurzweil 3000.
▪ All students grade 5-12 have access to High Interest-Low Vocabulary reading
materials.
▪ Students who require alternate input devices have access to Touch Monitors,
Intellikeys Keyboards and switch access in order to use the computers in their
general education, special education and computer labs.
▪ Staff has access to Boardmaker, Picture This and other software solutions used in
developing appropriate activities and addressing students' communication needs.
▪ Students have access to academic software ("News to You").
▪ Specialized software for social skills training, behavior and academics for lowincidence
students.
▪ The Carroll County Assistive Technology Team maintains an inventory of assistive
devices, academic and learning aids which can be accessed by staff for individual
students and/or entire classes.
▪ All students who require Augmentative Alternative Communication will have access
to communication aids across school, community and home environments as needed.
▪ Students have access to Co:Writer- word prediction, Write:Outloud -text to speech
software and DraftBuilder-outlining and webbing programs as determined by their
IEPs.
In order to provide a free and appropriate public education, students will have access to the
assistive technology which is required for them to access their curriculum in school,
community and home environments. If the required technology is not currently available
the school system is committed to obtaining the required technology solutions. IDEA funds
will be used to purchase additions to the current software inventory and assistive
technology library. Specific needs are noted in the district State Systemic Improvement
Plan-Student Success; Imagine the Possibilities (SSIP).
Administrative Uses of Technology
Hardware: All system and school level administrators, counselors, media specialists and
secretaries have a modern computer and access to the system-wide personnel and student
data base with Internet access and e-mail.
Software:
● Preferred administrative software is Microsoft Office.
● Student Information System from Infinite Campus is in place. A portal is utilized to
provide parents and students with web based access to student records and
information.
● A managed firewall service and content filter is in place and maintained.
● An electronic board meeting program, E-board, is utilized to communicate with the
community and system staff.
14
7. Professional Learning; All federal programs; E-Rate
A description of how the local educational agency will ensure that funds are
spent on scientifically and/or evidence-based practices and products for all
programs including the purchase of technology and technology tools. Where
applicable include how the practices and products will impact student
technology literacy.
All schools participate in the state-provided, online professional learning program,
Formative Instructional Practices. The impact of technology integration on classroom
instruction and student learning will be partially determined through student achievement
on norm-referenced test scores (ITBS), CRCT/Georgia Milestones EOG scores, Georgia
Milestones EOC scores, Career pathway Completion, and writing assessments. For eighth
grade students, technology literacy will be measured with the online tool 21st Century Skills
Assessment. Furthermore, effectiveness of technology integration will be measured by
students' ability to use technology in their daily work and lives. An evaluation of student
computer use will assess types of programs students prefer and will inform those designing
new curriculum of the topics needing attention in computer literacy courses for students
and teachers. In addition to test scores, computer use surveys for teachers, students,
administrators, and parents will be designed to gather additional information in the
evaluation process. Business, community, and post-secondary partners will also be
considered when collecting data to determine student preparedness for the world beyond
the classroom. A portion of Perkins IV funding is allocated each year to the CTAE Resource
Network which is a state-wide consortia supporting the professional learning of CTAE
teachers.
Students should learn life-long problem solving skills, how to work cooperatively with their
peers, and how to become responsible, effective, and efficient users of technology and
information. By having global information resources in classrooms, their motivation and
interest levels can be greatly enhanced. Students will participate in technology safety
advisement lessons throughout the year to help achieve this goal. Their knowledge of the
world around them and beyond them can grow as they communicate using a broad
spectrum of technology resources. The infusion of technology in Carroll County classrooms
assists students in developing skills necessary to be successful in a global society. Carroll
County Schools will continue to offer opportunities for using technology to students in the
classroom and beyond. Opportunities for computer use have increased with the addition of
computer labs and computers in every classroom. Students in middle school and high
school also have opportunities to engage in online courses or distance learning. These
meaningful opportunities encourage students to infuse technology into their own class
assignments, i.e., homework, research, projects and/or products. Students with disabilities
will have access to technology that is readily available in both the general education and
special education classrooms. This will provide students with the instructional
opportunities needed to generalize skills across various settings. Teachers are trained in
methods for integrating technology in the classroom, and additional courses will be offered
to teachers to maintain technology skill levels as well as opportunities for remediation. As
students continue to evolve with technology because it is part of their concept of the world
today, teachers should work to prepare lessons that are engaging and lessons that
incorporate technology.
15
As new technologies continue to change the world in which we live, they also provide many
new and positive educational benefits for classroom instruction. To encourage this growth,
students may now bring their own technology. School administrators and participating
teachers will continuously identify instructional benefits, evaluate, and refine the BYOT
(Bring Your Own Technology) program used with students in classrooms.
8. Title I, Part A; Title I, Part C; Title II, Part D; Title III; IDEA, EHCY
A description of how the LEA will use federal funds to coordinate and integrate
services with other educational services at the LEA or individual school level such as:
a. Technology, professional learning, curriculum, media, Title I, special education,
and EL programs;
b. Even Start, Head Start, Reading First, Early Reading First, IDEA preschool, and
other preschool programs, including plans for the transition of participants in
such programs to local elementary school programs;
c. Services for children with limited English proficiency, children with disabilities,
migratory children, neglected or delinquent youth, Indian immigrant children
in order to increase program effectiveness, eliminate duplication, and reduce
fragmentation of the instructional program.
The Assistant Superintendent for the Department of Teaching and Learning meets regularly
with the Directors of Teaching and Learning, Federal Programs, and Exceptional Children's
Services to align curriculum and instruction projects as well as determine funding for those
projects. All available funding sources are designated to meet the needs identified for the
school system. The meeting agendas include dissemination of materials and information to
be addressed, updating projects and professional learning offerings, setting deadlines, and
identifying needs. System initiatives are evaluated and monitored with adjustments made
to increase the effectiveness of the project. Other meetings are called as needed. The
Assistant Superintendent and Directors meet with all principals each month to discuss
current and upcoming issues. Additionally, some of the monthly meetings are scheduled
through the cluster model with an emphasis on monitoring for effective instruction and
vertical planning. Professional learning for administrators is structured into the cluster
meetings. All schools in Carroll County are divided into six five "clusters" based upon
geographical regions. These clusters include the area high school(s) and the middle and
elementary feeder schools. Academic directors and special education administrators
facilitate the curriculum and instructional needs of their assigned cluster. Meetings and
school visits are incorporated to monitor academic achievement in each area cluster.
The Director and other administrators from Exceptional Children's Services meet with
Principals, Assistant Principals and Special Education In-School Coordinators regularly to
provide information relating to school improvement issues and special education
compliance. IDEA funds are utilized to assist with professional learning for school
improvement issues, such as improving academic achievement for students with
disabilities, development of behavior intervention plans, innovative instructional practices,
16
assistive technology usage, standards based IEP's, differentiation, scaffolding, and team
collaboration.
Media Specialists and the Instructional Technology Specialist meet monthly during the
school year with the Assistant Superintendent to review media policies, technology needs
and professional learning. The County Framework for a Premier Learning Environment,
System Balanced Scorecard, System Strategy Map, and Instructional Delivery Model are
examples of the integration of federal, state and local programs working together. The
Framework for a Premier Learning Environment includes: Increasing Student Achievement
and Learning Processes for Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment; Ensuring Safe
Schools; Stakeholder Involvement; Support Processes for Staff, Students, Parents, and
Community; Developing Organizational Effectiveness Processes for Operations; Human
Resources; Finance; and Continuous Improvement.
There are twelve elementary and six middle Title I Schoolwide schools. The schoolwide
model enables the schools to coordinate and integrate programs, services, and funding
sources in a seamless manner. Title I schools have access to three Intervention Specialists
to help teachers integrate the instructional program with implementation of GSE countywide
initiatives, and technology to help increase student achievement. All students have
equal access to opportunities provided in the Title I schools and non-Title I schools.
The Homeless Liaison and Homeless Outreach Coordinator monitor the
identification/mobility and needs of the homeless population. Registrars have families
complete a residency questionnaire and refer homeless students to the homeless
liaison. Social Workers meet with the students and families to determine the
student/family needs. This information is forwarded to the homeless liaison. Among the
educational services offered to these students are regular education setting, EIP services,
gifted services, RTI services, special education services, English Language services,
tutoring, and counseling services. Social Workers communicate with teachers regularly to
ensure the student is making adequate progress. Homeless students are also given priority
for placement into preschool programs and the 12 for Life program. Homeless Preschool
children are referred to local Head Start Programs for services by the homeless liaison.
Transportation is provided to keep students in the school of origin whenever feasible. Title
I has set aside funds to satisfy the needs of the homeless population of students after
collaborating with the homeless liaison and community agencies.
Transitions of students with disabilities, who participate in any Preschool program, are
completed in conjunction with the receiving school in the spring prior to the fall the student
enters Carroll County Schools. Preschool special education staff, general education and
special education staff from the schools, parents, and other appropriate agency personnel
meet to review the child's IEP and address how the educational needs of the child will be
met. Pre-K and pre-school children visit kindergarten classrooms and attend an orientation
prior to transitioning into the kindergarten program. Preschool staff attend kindergarten
classrooms of select former preschool students for the first week of school to help students
17
transition into a new school situation and help establish routines. The Carroll County
school system partners with the University of West Georgia(UWG) to provide and inclusive
classroom that meets district and state guideline for Georgia's Pre-K Program. This
classroom is staffed by special education funds with a full-time certified special education
teacher so students can participate daily with same-age, non-disabled peers.
Transportation is provided and transition to the appropriate school is conducted with the
parents and UWG staff in the spring, prior to entering school in the fall. Transition
meetings are planned through the Preschool Assessment and Learning Services program
(PALS) at Carroll County Schools.
Title I funds are used to provide supplemental services for children with limited English
proficiency, migratory children, neglected or delinquent youth, immigrant children in order
to increase program effectiveness, eliminate duplication, and reduce fragmentation of the
instructional program. Some of the supplemental services provided include the following:
additional supplies and manipulatives, computer software programs specific to a content
area where a student may be struggling, technology, supplemental books, and tutoring in
content areas of need.
9. Title IV
A description of how the LEA will develop strategies that prevent violence in and
around schools and the illegal use of alcohol, tobacco, and drugs including how the
prevention activities meet the Principles of Effectiveness; involve parents; and
coordinate these efforts and resources with other federal, state, and community
entities. In addition the LEA must explain how evaluations of effectiveness will be
used to refine, improve, and strengthen the program strategies.
Carroll County Schools is part of the West Georgia RESA Safe and Drug Free Schools and
Communities consortium. Most of the drug, violence and tobacco standards are
incorporated into the science and health curricula. Specific research based programs are
selected based on the needs identified through the annual SDFSC survey. Additionally, the
school system works with the Carroll County Sheriff's Department to provide the EAGLE
program, a locally developed drug awareness, bully prevention program for fifth grade
students. Based on assessment data and in collaboration with system stakeholders
(parents, federal, state, and community leaders, and school officials), the school system
identifies and selects programs that meet the Principles of Effectiveness. The programs
currently in use are Choosing the Best, Bullying Prevention Program, and Positive Behavior
Supports (PBS). Students and teachers will participate in a survey. The results will be used
to reassess and adjust program offerings to meet identified student needs.
10. Title I, Part A; Title II, Part D
A description of the poverty and school eligibility criteria that will be used to select
attendance areas for schools eligible for funding through Title I, Part A and school
eligibility for grant opportunities through Title II, Part D.
Carroll County uses grade span ranking to rank schools below 75% free/reduced meals
status. Carroll County serves elementary schools and middle schools and a 618 school with
Title I, Part A funding. All schools are ranked by the attendance areas using the same
measure of poverty to include: (1) identifying eligible school attendance areas, (2)
18
determining the ranking of each area, and (3) determining the allocation for each area. The
poverty measure is determined by the number of students eligible for free or reduced price
meals (FRM) under the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act. The school system
ranks attendance areas based on the percentage of low-income children counted during the
October FTE submission to the GADOE. After the school system ranks all of its school
attendance areas by poverty, all schools above 75% must be served first in rank order of
poverty. After all school attendance areas with a poverty rate above 75% have been served,
the school system serves the lower-ranked areas. Carroll County Schools provides services
that are over and beyond what is provided with state and local funds to increase academic
achievement in Title I Schools in the school system. The school system no longer qualifies
for grant opportunities through Title II, Part D.
11. Title I, Part A; Title I, Part C; Title IV
A description of how teachers, in consultation with parents, administrators, and pupil
services personnel, will identify the eligible children most in need of services in Title
I targeted assistance schools.
Carroll County Schools does not have Title I Targeted Assistance Schools. All Title I Schools
in Carroll County are Schoolwide.
12. All Programs
A general description of the instructional program in the following:
a. Title I schoolwide schools,
b. Targeted assistance schools,
c. Schools for children living in local institutions for neglected or delinquent
children, and
d. Schools for children receiving education in neglected and delinquent
community day programs, if applicable.
All Carroll County elementary and middle schools are Title I School-wide, which enables the
system to implement instructional programs systematically throughout these schools.
Specific strategies vary by school. A system initiative for developing local curriculum
aligned to the new Georgia Standards of Excellence has been implemented for
English/Language Arts, Math Grade 6, 7, 8 and Science K-12 and English/Language Arts
and Math (K-12) for Georgia Standards of Excellence. Other system initiatives include
Literacy Instruction, Research-based Instructional Strategies, Balanced Assessments, Math
Instruction, and Leadership Development. The Title I School-wide programs serve all at-risk
students in the school. The goal of these schools is to provide high levels of academic
achievement in core content subjects for all students, especially for students considered atrisk
based upon academic needs. Each of the Title I schools conducts a comprehensive
needs assessment to identify the school's strengths and challenges in key areas that affect
student achievement. The schools develop a comprehensive school wide program plan that
provides a description of how challenges and needs will be achieved. An annual evaluation
of the outcomes and the implementation of the school wide plan transpires in order to
determine the following: whether the academic achievement of all students, particularly
low-achieving students, improved.
19
In- School and After-school tutoring sessions are provided for at-risk students. Sessions in
the spring (prior to the end of the school year) are held for students in grades 3, 5, and 8
who are at risk of not meeting standards on state mandated assessments. Summer
sessions are also held for credit recovery and remediation for the EOC. Extended school
year services are available for students with disabilities to address individualized goals and
objectives as determined by the IEP team. Currently, student progress is measured using
common assessments and benchmark assessments for the areas of English/Language Arts,
Reading, Science, Social Studies and Math. These are given as post-tests after the teaching
is complete for each unit. School system progress toward initiatives and goals is reported
on a locally developed Balanced Scorecard. Beginning in 2014-2015, all schools will begin
participation in the state-provided, online professional learning program, Formative
Instructional Practices.
Supplemental instructional programs used in elementary schools include spiral review,
Mountain Math, Mountain Language Arts, Direct Instruction (SRA), Orton Gillingham,
SPIRE, guided reading, Go To Math, COMPASS Learning. Students work on areas of
weakness to improve academic achievement. Title I schools share three Intervention
Specialists to assist with data analysis, professional learning, research-based instructional
practices, and differentiation of instruction.
Elementary teachers are currently working to design curriculum documents and common
assessments that align with the Georgia Standards of Excellence. Vertical teams of teachers
have met to design local curriculum documents that are aligned to GSE. Content teacher
teams meet (at the school and district level) to examine student results and Achievement
Level Descriptors (ALDS) to determine the rigor of instruction for upcoming units of
instruction. Students in danger of not meeting standards on state assessments, referred to
as bubble students, are targeted for additional differentiated instruction during extending
learning time in the instructional day. Supplemental research-based instructional
programs are used with at-risk students to increase their chances of success.
The middle school program is based on the middle school concept for students in grades six
through eight. The program addresses the needs and interests of students during transition
between elementary school and high school. This student-focused approach to education is
achieved through academic blocks of instruction and Connections course offerings. Flexible
scheduling, interdisciplinary curriculum, and differentiated instruction are key elements of
middle school programming. Teams of academic teachers, who share common planning
periods, work with groups of students to create an environment for learning that is
challenging and safe. Students are placed in flexible groups according to their performance
on particular assessment domains and from formative assessments. The middle school
program in Carroll County emphasizes a rigorous curriculum which includes
reading/literature, language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, physical education,
health, and various Connections courses. Each school offers two segments of
English/language arts per day for all students during the academic block. Additional
instruction in reading and mathematics is provided during Connections time. Connections
classes are used to assist students in broadening their skills and to assist them in
developing career goals. Students are rotated through physical education, technology,
business, art, band and chorus during the school year. A focus on maintaining a school
climate which recognizes and encourages academic excellence and high achievement for all
students is a key component of the middle school program. Teachers have received training
on the use of math manipulatives and will include them in their teaching units.
Commented [1]: Change the dates?
20
The Carroll County School System has five high schools, two College & Career Academies
(CCA), and one alternative school program. Each school is dedicated to increasing student
achievement and accountability to match increasing state standards and national goals. A
focused approach to improving the quality of instruction in the academic arena as well as
the technology/career area is being targeted through a results-oriented, standards-based
curriculum project, emphasizing prioritized objectives and essential skills.
Through diverse programming, the secondary program is committed to providing students
opportunities for academic advancement, personal growth, and extracurricular
development. Carroll County high schools are committed to preparing all students for postsecondary
education and high performance demands of a quality workforce in business and
industry. Carroll County's high school instructional program is designed on a traditional
seven-period day. In addition, a fee-based summer school is available for initial credit and
credit recovery. Vertical department teams have worked through collegial planning to
develop instructional units. The high schools continue to add new Advanced Placement
classes, and most of the College Board AP courses are offered in Carroll County Schools.
Emphasis is placed on increasing enrollment of under-represented populations in these
courses. With the passage of the Move On When Ready legislation, high schools are
extending greater opportunities for students to take dual enrollment classes through the
local technical college and the local university. Transition planning for students with
disabilities addresses multiple options for students with disabilities. High school students
with disabilities are offered the involvement of outside agencies for transition planning and
career/job placement. Students are offered a counselor through Vocational Rehabilitation
to assist with the planning process to ensure college and career readiness upon exiting high
school. Other opportunities are provided through various programs such as support to
attend the CCSS College and Career academy and 12 for Life. Special education teachers
and staff are on sight to support students with disabilities who meet eligibility criteria for
each program.
Students are provided opportunities to take online or virtual courses through online
vendors such as Georgia Virtual School and Virtual High School. Dual enrollment
opportunities are provided through two community institutions: University of West Georgia
and West Georgia Technical College. A wide variety of CTAE programs are available to
students. These programs include: Healthcare Science, Business Education, Information
Technology, Agriculture, Early Childhood Education, Engineering & Robotics, Culinary
Arts, Automotive Technology, Climate Control Technology, Graphic Design,
Broadcast/Video Production, Family and Consumer Science, Marketing and JROTC. In
addition, dual- enrollment programs in Welding, Cosmetology, and Nurse Aid are available
with our local state technical college.
QBE funds are used to fund the program and staff required by QBE. In addition, local
funds are used to supplement QBE funds to reduce class size, provide paraprofessionals
and to provide additional instructional materials. Title II funds are used to reduce class size
and to provide professional learning to teachers. IDEA funds will be used to hire additional
special education paraprofessionals to support instruction and student need as determined
by the IEP.
Title I funds are used to supplement and support instruction for all students in grades
kindergarten through eighth. Funds are utilized to reduce class size at the elementary level,
21
provide additional paraprofessional support in instructional settings, and provide a
designated parent liaison/coordinator. Instructional material funds are utilized to purchase
supplemental research based materials.
Students with disabilities are served within their home schools when appropriate. Gifted
students are served through resource, cluster, and advance content models. Procedures for
referral/ eligibility to the gifted program insure equitable consideration for all students
including under-represented populations. In alignment with science GPS and health QCC,
students receive instruction on drug and safety issues. Counselors, school social workers,
and school nurses provide support for students in need.
Homes for neglected or delinquent students in Carroll County include Alice's House and
KidsPeace. Residents of both homes attend Carroll County Schools. Students participate in
programs designed to address potential high risk areas. The Sheriff Department's EAGLE
program addresses drug/substance abuse, bullying, and gang prevention. Other programs
include Botvin Life Skills, Peer Mediation, Choosing the Best, Super VIP. Carroll County
emphasizes the use of effective instructional practices and programs. The goals on the
balanced scorecard address at risk students in all subject areas. To meet the needs of all
students, grade level and vertical teams are encouraged to plan on a regular basis. Georgia
Standards of Excellence curriculum maps and data analysis are utilized to drive
instruction. Tutorial programs are provided based on the needs of individual students.
13. Title I, Part A; IDEA; EHCY
A description of the services the LEA will provide homeless children who are eligible
to receive services under applicable federal programs. The description should include
the following:
a. An assessment of the educational and related needs of homeless children and
youths;
b. A description of the services and programs for which assistance is sought to
address the needs identified;
c. A description of policies and procedures, consistent with section 722(e)(3), that
the LEA will implement to ensure that activities carried out by the agency will
not isolate or stigmatize homeless children and youth.
Carroll County has implemented a program called Families in Transition (FIT). Posters and
other information are visible in schools, local agencies, and other public places showing
information and contact information. Information is sent home with all students at the
beginning of each school year he with explaining McKinney-Vento Law and services
available. McKinney-Vento Program is discussed at Annual Title I Meetings and with
Principals during one of the monthly scheduled meetings. Front office staffs, counselors,
bus drivers and administrators are trained to recognize homeless situations and offer
services to families as needed. A residency questionnaire is included in the enrollment
packets and in open house packets at each school. The questionnaire is designed to assist
in the identification of homeless families.
The Homeless Liaison and Homeless Outreach Coordinator provide ongoing training to
transportation personnel, enrollment personnel, school counselors and school
administration every year. This training covers the McKinney-Vento definition of homeless
22
children and youth and the services provided and how to access them. Sensitivity to the
needs and issues surrounding homelessness is also emphasized at these training sessions.
The Homeless Liaison and Homeless Outreach Coordinator also provide the same training
to stakeholders/community agencies. The trainings are provided for Family Connections,
DFCS, Juvenile Court and church groups.
The Homeless Liaison works with other departments and agencies to provide services to
homeless children. The ESOL program works with the liaison to provide translation and
assistance understanding cultural differences. Through the SST process, appropriate
interventions and evaluations to determine eligibility for Special Education services are
provided to students who are determined to be homeless. Students are assisted in locating
available pre-school opportunities in the county. The Department of Family and Children's
Services works with liaison to allow temporarily placed students to attend their home
school preventing multiple school placements. Youth Connections works with families by
offering parenting classes and family counseling in an effort to keep families together.
Family Connections provides the forum to educate local agencies about McKinney-Vento
and provides family access to social services. The Domestic Violence/Emergency Shelter
provides counseling and case management for victims of domestic violence. They work
closely with liaison to ensure that children are transported to their school of origin.
School supplies are available to all identified homeless students. Students receive a
backpack, pencils, paper and necessary school supplies needed to start the school year.
The Homeless Liaison delivers supplies to homeless students as needed throughout the
school year. The Homeless Liaison has clothing available and items may be purchased
quickly for students with specific needs. Transportation costs are supplemented through
the grant for those students who are transported to their school of origin. Transportation
assistance is provided for students in the after school program and from extracurricular
activities. Transportation assistance is provided to and from summer programs. Parent
Education packets which include information on attendance, the Carroll County Code of
Conduct, and additional information on how to help their children with homework and
discipline are provided. Parenting workshops are offered throughout the school year
through Title I Parenting and ESOL Outreach. Title I workshops revolve around student
achievement and meeting the needs of at-risk students.
Homeless students are referred to Summer Programs within the community as needed or
desired. Homeless students that are struggling academically are referred to tutoring by a
certified teacher. This tutoring can take place during the day or after school to help meet
the needs of the student and the family.
Case Management and Social Services are provided by the school social workers. Referrals
are made to appropriate agencies for assistance and intensive case management when
necessary. School social workers contact the homeless liaison when problems arise.
Students enrolling with expired Special Education paperwork or a referral for psychological
assessment have the opportunity for an expedited evaluation of strengths and needs
through the Exceptional Children's Services Department.
Homeless students are referred to local Preschool Programs as needed. Carroll County has
twenty-three state funded preschool classrooms and priority is given to homeless students
placed on the waiting list. Homeless students may be referred to Head Start. When
appropriate, the Special Education Preschool Assessment and Learning Services (PALS)
23
serve as a resource to preschool children. PALS works to assist three to five year old special
needs children who are determined to be homeless. Assistance with obtaining school
records; counseling; or other extraordinary needs is provided. Medical issues are addressed
when necessary. Assistance is provided to parents or guardians in completing the Medicaid
and Peachcare paperwork when applicable. Students no longer eligible for Medicaid or
Peachcare are provided optional assistance needed. School nurses and social workers
provide assistance as needed.
14. Title I, Part A; Title I, Part C; Title II, Part D; Title III; Title IV; IDEA
A description of the strategies the LEA will use to implement effective parental
involvement in all programs. The description must include the following
a. How the LEA included state and local government representatives,
representatives of schools to be served, parents, teachers, students, and
relevant community-based organizations in the development of the
Comprehensive Plan for Improving Student Academic Achievement.
b. How the LEA included opportunities for all parents of students receiving Title I
services to be included in the development and yearly revision of the LEA
parental involvement policy and in the decisions regarding how the 1% setaside
for parental involvement are allotted for parental involvement activities.
c. How the LEA will provide the coordination, technical assistance, and other
support necessary to assist schools in planning and implementing effective
parent involvement activities to improve student academic achievement and
school performance.
d. How the LEA will build school and parents capacity for strong parental
involvement through the six requirements in law (Section 1118(e)) with
particular attention on how to support a partnership among the school,
parents, and community.
e. How the LEA will coordinate and integrate parental involvement strategies
under NCLB with other community based programs such as Head Start, Reading
First, Even Start, State operated preschool programs, etc.
f. How the LEA will conduct an annual evaluation of the content and effectiveness
of parental involvement.
g. How the LEA will use data from the annual evaluation to design strategies for a
more effective parental involvement policy.
Various parental involvement activities are conducted throughout the school year at Title I
Schools using flexible schedules based upon the needs of the parents and other pertinent
stakeholders including business partners and community representatives. Title I schools
will have parent representation on various committees/teams to provide parents with
opportunities to formulate suggestions, share experiences with other parents, and
participate as appropriate in decisions relating to the education of their child including
ways they can monitor their children's progress. Childcare and transportation are provided
to parents when needed to encourage participation in Title I school/system activities to
24
eliminate parental involvement barriers for parents desiring to participate and provide
input in their student's education. An agenda, sign-in sheet, and meeting
evaluation/survey will be maintained by the Title I Director.
The Title I Director and school contracted Parent Coordinators will provide coordination,
support, and technical assistance to Title I schools in planning and implementing effective
parental involvement programs. The Title I Director will assist the school contracted Parent
Coordinators and Principals by ensuring the effective planning and implementation of the
parent involvement program. The above tasks are provided, at a minimum, in CCS by the
following ways:
● Developing written School/Home Compacts each year.
● Developing and providing timely information about schoolwide programs and
activities.
● Providing parents with their child's individual student assessment results, including
an interpretation of such results.
● Ensuring parental involvement and input regarding the 1% Parental Involvement Set
Aside.
● Presenting a description and explanation of the curriculum and the form of
assessments used to measure student progress.
● Offering opportunities for regular parent meetings and educational workshops at the
school level (information obtained by end-of-the year parent survey).
● Offering training for schools and parents to help bridge the gap between the school
and home. Training needs may include, but are not limited to, testing/assessment
information, health and wellness training, and other information of interest to all
stakeholders based upon the results of parental surveys.
● Distributing written materials to enhance parenting skills and to increase effective
communication between the home and school.
● Providing child care for meetings, programs, and workshops.
● Providing translation of information to languages other than English when such
information/services relate to parent involvement.
● Providing parents with an opportunity to evaluate the effectiveness of the Title I
Program in the form of a survey.
The Title I Director will meet and/or communicate periodically with the Title I school
administrators and school contracted Parent Coordinators to provide guidance and
assistance regarding all of the items listed above. Also, the Title I Director will collect and
review data in order to monitor the progress of the Parental Involvement Plan. The Title I
Director will maintain documentation for all technical assistance meetings.
The Title I Program coordinates and integrates parent involvement strategies with other
programs such as the Early Intervention Program (EIP), Special Education, Flexible
Learning Program Plans (FLP), English Learners (EL), and State-Funded Pre-Kindergarten
25
(Pre-K) whenever appropriate and feasible. Representatives from the above programs meet
throughout the school year to plan and implement joint parental involvement activities.
Activities are planned and implemented on a systemwide and individual school basis
depending on the parameter of the targeted activities.
In addition to the above programs, parents are encouraged to provide input regarding their
children's education by participating in the following ways:
● Attending Title I Annual meetings, monthly (if applicable) PTO meetings, and Open
House meetings held at participating schools.
● Attending parent meetings, workshops, and activities held during the school year
that may be coordinated by the contracted Title I Parenting Coordinator and School
Administration.
● Attending and requesting individual parent-teacher meetings/conferences as
practicable.
● Serving on various school committees at participating schools.
● Reviewing written information/correspondences from participating schools.
● Volunteering to assist in participating schools and individual classrooms.
● CCS will take the following actions to ensure that information related to parental
involvement (programs, workshops, meetings, and activities) is sent to the parents of
participating students in an understandable and clear format to include alternative
formats upon request:
● All parental involvement announcements/notices will be written and formatted
where parents can clearly read and comprehend.
● All communication/correspondences to EL parents will be translated in versions
applicable to their language.
● Interpreters will be provided for conferences, meetings, etc... as needed.
Annual evaluations also referred to as Middle/Elementary School Parent
Perception/Title I Surveys are made available online in the spring to obtain feedback
concerning the effectiveness of the plan to increase the participation of parents, and to
identify barriers for greater participation of parents (particularly parents who are
economically disadvantaged, disabled, have limited English proficiency, have limited
literacy, or of any racial or ethnic minority) in each of the schools. The Title I Director
creates the survey and provides each school with a link to access the surveys. Hard copies
of the surveys are also made available by each school in order to meet the needs of parents.
The data collected from the evaluation/survey, along with input from parent's serving on
various committees, are used to monitor, revise, and update the Parental Involvement Plans
at the school/system levels and School-Parent Compacts. To ensure that parents are
notified in multiple ways of the importance of the evaluation and the opportunity to
participate, the survey information is placed on the agenda at the LEA Annual I Title I
Parent and Stakeholder meeting, discussed at each of the school's Annual Title I meeting,
26
announced in school newsletters, posted on the school websites, and announced in
multiple facets based upon the methods chosen by each school. Schools are encouraged to
utilize a computer in their Title I Parenting Areas for parents who may not have access to
technology at home.
Responses and comments from the evaluation/survey and committees will be summarized
and used to design strategies and initiatives for school improvement. Following the annual
review, schools administration will provide committees with the results of the surveys in
order to revise the plan as needed and to foster and improve parental involvement in
participating schools. The data will be used to revise compacts and the Carroll County
Schools Parental Involvement Plan. Participating schools will submit all unsatisfactory
parent comments and comments regarding parental involvement services and school plans
to the Title I Director.

The CCS will provide technical assistance to Title I schools regarding the topics described in
the above paragraph. Each participating Title I School will offer various workshops,
trainings, and classes for parents in order to discuss the academic achievement of students
in the core content area. Topics such as academic standards, state
assessments/alternative assessments, monitoring student progress, and parental
involvement will be the focus of each Title I activity. Curriculum-based events will be held
at participating schools based upon various needs assessments, parental feedback, and
student performance on standardized testing to include topics such as: Understanding
GSE, CCRPI workshops, Homework Help workshops, Family Reading Nights, Math/Science
Family events, Curriculum Night events that may highlight state mandated assessments.
The ESOL Program will incorporate a Parent Outreach Program for the parents of English
Learners (EL). Schools will provide transition workshops where they provide parents and
students transitioning from Pre-K to Kindergarten, elementary to middle school, and middle
school to high school with pertinent information regarding a successful transition to the
next level.
As academic standards are discussed, schools will use various manipulatives and
technology to provide parents with a simulation of what occurs in the core content
classrooms of their students. Brochures, pamphlets, and handouts will be provided for
parents as they participate in the various Title I activities in each of the schools.
Contracted Parent Coordinators will have an opportunity to attend the Parent Engagement
Conference where they will receive information for building stronger, equal partnerships
with shared responsibilities among parents, schools and communities.
Title I Schools will use their Parenting Areas to disseminate pamphlets, brochures, and
handouts to help parents work with their children to improve student achievement. The
school district provided each Title I School with a pamphlet/brochure organizer and various
Title I related brochures. Each school will use either their 1% Parental Involvement Set-
27
Aside or a portion of their Title I School Allocation to purchase additional materials to assist
parents as they work to improve their children's academic achievement.
The System Level Parent Coordinator will work with each of the school's contracted Parent
Coordinators to develop trainings that will help the parents as they work with their children
to improve their academic achievement. A 1% Parental Involvement Set Aside Form will be
distributed at the Title I Parent and Stakeholder Input meeting to provide parents with an
opportunity to provide feedback regarding the way the funds may be spent to assist them
as they work jointly with the school to improve student achievement.
Schools will use technology as a learning tool for parents as they demonstrate the use of
technology in the classroom (iPads, Promethean Boards, Activotes, etc...) and accessing the
parent portal to monitor academic student records. Furthermore, schools will provide
information that supports student learning at home in the area of literacy by promoting
family reading, vocabulary development, and reading comprehension.
The CCS will address the training of teachers and staff regarding parental involvement
through school level efforts. School level administrators will hold faculty meetings
throughout the school year to educate teachers and staff about various ways to foster
meaningful relationships with parents. Teachers and staff will be provided with ways to
reach out, communicate with, and work with parents jointly in the endeavor to improve
student achievement. Core subject departmental meetings will be utilized to identify ways
to include parents in the homework process, develop activities that parents can use at
home to enhance student learning, and coordinate special projects that allow parents to be
involved in the learning process.
The Title I Program coordinates and integrates parent involvement strategies with other
programs such as the Early Intervention Program (EIP), Special Education, Flexible
Learning Program Plans (FLP), English Learners (EL), and State-Funded Pre-Kindergarten
(Pre-K) whenever appropriate and feasible. Representatives from the above programs meet
throughout the school year to plan and implement joint parental involvement activities.
Activities are planned and implemented on a systemwide and individual school basis
depending on the parameter of the targeted activities.
All CCS Title I Schools have a designated Parenting Area for parents to encourage and
support parental involvement. School administrators, faculty, and staff will coordinate and
integrate parental involvement strategies with various programs by providing parent
resources, as appropriate, to nurture learning, promote family literacy, and support parents
as equal partners in education. Schools will host parent meetings to foster confidence in
parents as their child's first teacher and support home as an extension of the classroom.
CCS will provide written communication, as appropriate in an understandable language to
parents in participating schools. Contracted services of translators and interpreters will be
28
used to translate Title I related documents and interpret at Title I activities, workshops, and
training upon request, and, to the extent feasible.
Temple Middle School and Temple Elementary School participated in the Academic Parent
Teacher Team (APTT) initiative during the 2015-2016 school year and will continue their
efforts. The focus of parental involvement requirements under Title I is to improve the
academic achievement of the lowest performing students. Following this path, the state is
interested in studying the use and impact of Academic Parent Teacher Teams (APTT) on
student achievement. The APTT model was highlighted at the recent Georgia Family
Engagement Conference and the GADOE is committed to developing it further in our Title I
schools throughout Georgia. The APTT model supplements the efforts of traditional parent
conferences with whole-class meetings where parents learn exactly where their child is in
comparison to academic standards, where their child needs to be by the end of the school
year, and how they can help support their child's learning outside of the
classroom. Parents become committed partners in working alongside the teacher to help
their child achieve in specific academic achievement goal areas. TMS' Title I School
allocation will be used to fund the training. This initiative is included in Temple Middle
School's Title I Schoolwide Plan. Temple will serve as a model for other Title I schools in
Carroll County and the school system will use Temple's experience with the program to
build capacity throughout the school district.
15. Title I, Part A
A description of the actions the LEA will take to assist its schools identified as
Priority Schools, Focus Schools, and Title I, Part A Alert Schools.
Carroll County Schools has one school identified as a Focus School for FY17. Bowdon
Middle School will remain a Focus School. In an effort to support Bowdon Middle and to
meet the requirements of the Georgia Department of Education's ESEA Flexibility Waiver,
Carroll County School System's Teaching and Learning Department will provide the
following:
· Analyze data for designated schools and determine focus for system support.
· Identify barriers to the school's efforts and take action to eliminate through
change in district policy/procedure if necessary.
· Analyze feeder school data and develop and implement a vertical plan to
address identified needs.
· Provide appropriate resources to schools in a timely manner.
· Monitor and support implementation of school improvement plan and flexible
learning program plan for all schools and ensure the plan is supported through
an aligned budget.
· Monitor and ensure implementation of the Short-Term Action Plans.
· Participate in on-going professional learning sponsored by the GaDOE.
· Provide instructional support to address the needs of the lowest performing
25th percentile of students based on skill deficits.
29
· Consultant to provide teacher support addressing team collaborative settings
for SWD.
· Provide appropriate support by the Exceptional Children's Services Department
in addressing SWD.
16. Title I, Part A
A description of the actions the LEA will take to implement Flexible Learning
Program (FLP) for schools identified as Priority Schools, Focus Schools, and (where
applicable) Title I, Part A Alert Schools.
Using prior assessment data, the Director of Federal Programs and contracted Title I
Consultant will work in conjunction with the Administration of the Focus School to identify
the content area(s) and subgroup(s) to be addressed in the FLP plan. After the identified
students in Bowdon Middle School have been placed in one of the three federal rank
order outlined by the Georgia Department of Education, the Director of Federal Programs
will collaborate with the Principal to create a multiple selection, educationally related
criteria rubric to rank the students within their identified ranking.
The Director of Federal Programs, Title I RESA Specialist, and Focus Schools Principal will
work collaboratively to develop the FLP plan. The Focus School will convene a meeting to
discuss the FLP plan with all of the parents and stakeholders. The stakeholders will be
invited to the meeting using multiple modes. An agenda and sign-in sheet will be
maintained by the Director of Federal Programs. A form will be developed to encourage
parents to provide input/make recommendations for the FLP plan. The Director of Federal
Programs will ensure that the parents of the Focus School are notified at least twice
annually of the availability of FLP services. The first notification will occur at the beginning
of the school year and will include the date that the services/program will begin, an
overview of the plan, and their child's eligibility to participate in the program. The second
notification will occur at the beginning of the second semester.
The FLP plan will include measurable performance goals and targets for all subgroups. The
steps for identifying students receiving FLP services will be included in the plan with a copy
of the multiple selection criteria rubric sheet used. The scientifically researched based
strategies used by each school to ensure supplemental academic interventions with regards
to meeting the academic performance goals will be included in the FLP plan. The
assessment instruments used to measure each program target and goal will be outlined in
the FLP plan. Each school will outline the program delivery model that will be implemented
to include a master schedule with the times included, transportation services if applicable,
and student/teacher ratios. The FLP plan will include procedures that ensure the
instructional goals align with the curriculum-GSE. The plan includes information
regarding how and by whom the FLP plan will be monitored and expenses will be tracked.
An evaluation to determine the effectiveness of the plan and the assessments used will be
conducted annually. The results of the evaluation will be shared with all stakeholders. In
30
addition to sharing information pertaining to program effectiveness, parents/guardians of
participating students will be informed on an on-going basis about the student's progress
toward their individual academic goals.
17. Title I, Part A; Title II, Part A and Title II, Part D; Title III; IDEA
A description of how the LEA will ensure that teachers and paraprofessionals meet
the highly qualified requirements in Title I section 1119, QUALIFICATIONS FOR
TEACHERS AND PARAPROFESSIONALS. Description must include:
a. Highly Qualified trend data for LEA and school
b. Information about numbers of teachers (disaggregated by subject taught and
grade level) who lack certification and who are NOT designated as highly
qualified;
c. Activities of how the LEA will develop strategies and use funds to support
teachers in becoming highly qualified;
d. The percentage of teachers and administrators who are technologically literate;
the method(s) used to determine teacher and administrator technology literacy;
and strategies the school system will implement to increase the percentage of
teachers and administrators who are technologically literate;
e. A description of how the LEA will certify that all teachers in any language
instruction educational program for limited English proficient students that is,
or will be funded under Title III, are fluent in English and any other language
used for instruction, including having written and oral communication skills;
Highly Qualified Status
For the FY16 school year, 99.91% of the teachers and 99.55% of the paraprofessionals
were considered highly qualified. All administrative personnel are fully certified. All options
(testing, coursework, and HOUSSE) are utilized to ensure the greatest possible percentage
of certified personnel will be highly qualified by the fall CPI. GACE costs are reimbursed
with Title II, Part A funds to teachers if program needs require the addition of content areas
or concentrations. All teachers completing HOUSSE are provided appropriate guidance and
support.
Parents Right to Know:
All schools in the Carroll County School System will mail the "Parent's Right to Know
Letter" using the template provided by the GADOE. Each school will also post a copy of the
signed letter that is mailed home on their website. Some of the schools have biographies of
their teachers on their website. Each Principal sends a signed document to the Director of
Federal Programs indicating that all letters are mailed. A copy of the letter is then placed in
the registration packets of each school for students who enroll after the letters have been
distributed.
The universal usage of Gmail, Google Drive, Sites, Promethean and/or SMART technologies,
the Statewide Longitudinal Data Systems and Georgia Online Formative Assessment
Resource in Carroll County Schools puts the amount of teachers and administrators who
are technology literate at 100%. Observations made by the Instructional Technology
Specialist throughout the 2016-2017 school year have brought the district to this
31
percentage. Obviously, some teachers are savvier than others and the district is always
working to improve technology skills with all teachers and administrators.
For FY17 the Instructional Services Coordinator will continue the Just In Time professional
development focused on technology. They will work closely with the technology department
to make sure all teachers and administrators have the skills needed to effectively
incorporate technology into their classrooms and schools.
ESOL Teachers: The Carroll County School System certifies that all teachers of ESOL
students are fluent in written and oral fluency through the interview process. Each year
the ESOL teachers will be required to provide a writing sample. The Director of Federal
Programs visits all of the ESOL classrooms throughout the academic school year to observe
the ESOL teachers written and oral communication skills as they work with teachers and
students. TKES is also used as a means of ensuring that all teachers of ESOL students are
fluent in written and oral English.
18. Professional Learning; and all federal programs
A description of how the LEA will provide training and/or incentives to enable
teachers to:
a. Teach to the needs of students, particularly students with disabilities, students
with special learning needs (including those who are gifted and talented), and
those with limited English proficiency;
b. Improve student behavior in the classroom;
c. Involve parents in their child's educations; and
d. Understand and use data and assessments to improve classroom practice and
student learning.
Become and remain technologically literate.
Carroll County Schools has a systematic plan for providing ongoing GSE implementation
support for all teachers. This is accomplished through the Teacher Induction Program (TIP)
and yearlong team collaborative planning in each school. This is facilitated by the
Intervention Specialists in elementary and in middle schools district level staff with
Exceptional Children's Services and department chairs in high schools. This plan is funded
by QBE Professional Learning funds and federal funds. System achievement data has
indicated specific content needs in the areas of math. In disaggregating data further by
subgroups students with disabilities results yield a need in literacy. As a result, additional
professional learning opportunities have been planned. Administrators and teachers will be
given opportunities to expand their knowledge and skills in the areas of performance based
learning and GSE. Disaggregation of the achievement data indicates gaps in learning for
economically disadvantaged students and students with disabilities (SWD). Diversity
training is an initiative for the school system in FY16. The additional diversity training will
help the teachers reach the economically disadvantaged child. Professional Learning in the
following areas will be on-going by Exceptional Children's Services staff, RESA, Consultants
and Intervention Specialists: Differentiating Instruction, Team Co-Teaching, Effective
Instruction in the Inclusive Classroom, MindSet, Working with Children with Autism in the
32
School Setting, Multi-sensory reading instruction, RTI, ISC Boot-Camp, Standards Based
IEPs, Provision of Supplementary Instruction, Implementation of Instructional Practices
through Technology for Struggling Learners, Behavioral supports for Effective Classroom
Management and Progress Monitoring. Other topics will be offered as needed. For Special
Education Paraprofessionals, training in Understanding Students with Disabilities and How
they Learn, Implementation of Academic Strategies and Effective Behavioral Supports will
be offered. Effective team collaborative / inclusion implementation and vocabulary
supports will be continued in order to accelerate the learning of SWD in the general
education setting. In addressing low-incidence students teachers will be trained on specific
reading instruction strategies and vocabulary enrichment in an effort to build
compensatory skills in addressing GSE and providing grade level access to the standards.
ECS staff provides information to parents about specific disabilities and how to work with
their special needs child. Training will continue to support parents through various open
house opportunities, transition fairs and designated preschool parent nights for students 3-
5. All schools will continue training teachers using the online Formative Instructional
Practices modules.
The Carroll County School System implements a systemwide RTI strategic plan. The plan
focuses on creating consistent and pervasive RTI procedures across all schools to ensure
that all students are provided the appropriate supports in order to be college and career
ready. A RTI District Strategic Team meets throughout the school year to determine next
steps in improving processes and procedures as a system. A RTI website, a RTI framework
and essential guiding documents have been developed as a result of the systemwide RTI
strategic plan. Professional learning will continue to be used as a driving force to
communicate procedures and expectations to promote equity for all students.
ESOL Teachers: The Carroll County School System certifies that all teachers of ESOL
students are fluent in written and oral fluency through the interview process. In times past
and for the FY16 school year, ESOL teachers will be required to provide a writing sample.
The Director of Federal Programs visits all of the ESOL classrooms throughout the
academic school year to observe the ESOL teachers written and oral communication skills
as they work with teachers and students. TKES is also used as a means of ensuring that
all teachers of ESOL students are fluent in written and oral English.
19. Professional Learning and all federal programs
A description of how the LEA will develop a three-year professional learning plan that
will be included in the LEA Comprehensive System Improvement Plan according to
the requirements in Rule 160-3-3-.04 PROFESSIONAL LEARNING.
The Strategic Professional Learning Plan for Carroll County Schools is a major component
of the System Strategic Plan. Professional Learning is governed by the Department of
Teaching and Learning. Goals and objectives are identified through needs assessments
administered in the spring of each school year and through personnel evaluations. Needs
assessments, student achievement data, CCRPI results, and system/school improvement
goals form the basis for the plan, which is revised annually. Each school's School
Improvement Plan has a professional learning component designed to address the specific
needs of the students and personnel in that school. The system and school plans are
33
aligned and identify annual, measurable student outcomes. All program descriptions
include statements of need, objectives, activities, evaluations, and budget information. The
plan is formatively evaluated through the collection and analysis of session evaluations and
through the evaluation of instructional program effectiveness. In addition, the plan and all
related budgets are reviewed annually and updated as indicated by an analysis of all
available data.
20. Professional Learning; and all federal programs
A description of the activities that the LEA will carry out with program funds,
including professional learning for teachers and principals and how their activities
will align with challenging state academic standards. The description should outline
the LEA professional learning programs and sources. The LEA professional learning
programs should be consistent with nationally established criteria for quality
professional learning, with such characteristics as incentives, self-directed learning,
and authentic connections to actual work.
The supplemental professional learning activities provided by Carroll County Schools fall
into several categories. The professional learning activities for teachers and principals will
align with the challenging state academic standards. Activities are provided for all staff
including bus drivers, paraprofessionals, custodians/maintenance personnel, and school
nutrition personnel.
● Baseline classes: CCRPI, GSE, Differentiated Instruction, Co-Teaching, How to use
Assistive Technology in the Classroom, Instructional technology focused on Students
with Disabilities (SWD), Working with Children with Autism in the School Setting,
Non-violent Crisis Intervention, RTI, Implementing Technology into the Classroom,
and Formative Instructional Practices.
● Induction: TIP, mentoring and coaching, Aspiring Leaders, New Special Education
Teacher Academy and New Principal Support
● Specific content classes: GSE Redelivery, on-going support, and follow-up; Math
Instruction-GSE Unit Review and Math Framework; Multi-sensory reading program
for SWD and Literacy Instruction
● Specific teacher needs: Classroom Management, Diversity Training, Communication,
Differentiated Instruction, Co-Teaching , RTI, Writing Appropriate IEPs, Progress
Monitoring, Workers Compensation, Gifted Certification, Cluster Professional
Learning, and TKES Professional Learning
● Technology: (As a topic) Promethean Boards, PowerPoint, Google Drive, Infinite
Campus training, SLDS, Prezi, Flipped Classroom, Uses for instructional technology
in addressing SWD and Google Apps for Education Suite training
● Technology: (As instructional support): Study Island , Fast Forward, Virtual High
School, Georgia Virtual School, Edgenuity, TeachTown and Edusoft
● Student Support: Bus Safety and Discipline, Mindset, Drugs Awareness, Violence
Prevention, and Online Paraprofessional courses, Schools Nutrition: Food Handling &
Safety, Safety Plan Development, Safety Summit, Counselor Consortia, Nurses
Consortia, Social Workers Consortia, Infinite Campus training, Target Solutions, AED
training, CPR and First Aid.
34
For FY16, 100% of the professional learning activities were scientifically based and 100% of
the teachers in the system participated in at least one high quality professional learning
activity.
All of the above professional learning activities for teachers and principals will be funded
through the integration and coordination of Title I, Part A, SIG 1003a, Title II A, Title III A,
IDEA, GLISI Grants, Carl B. Perkins, local, and QBE funds. The Title I, Part A professional
learning activities are consistent with nationally established criteria for quality professional
learning. Professional learning communities, self-directed learning, re-delivery, workshops,
conferences, and authentic connections to actual work are some of the characteristics of
the professional learning opportunities funded with Title I, Part A and other funding
sources.
21. Title I, Part A; Title I, Part C; Title I, Part D; Title III; Title IV, Part A
A description of how the LEA will notify private schools of availability of funds to
serve eligible children in each applicable federal program.
In the fall and spring of each year, private schools with students who are residents of
Carroll County are contacted by certified mail. They are invited to attend a consultative
meeting to discuss the availability of funds to assist eligible private school students and
teachers. The letter includes the date, time and location of the meeting, a response form,
and gives the name of the federal program contacts. An alternate meeting date is arranged,
if needed. The meeting agenda includes a plan for services and a process for
communication. In the spring of each year, Exceptional Children's Services, invites private
school providers and home school parent representatives to provide input on the use of
IDEA funds to serve students with disabilities. A review of the Child Find process and
various resources available are explained. Meeting information is shared on the Carroll
County Schools website along with individual letters/invitations mailed to all private
schools and homeschool parents as identified on the school district information system.
Complaints are addressed by the Director of Federal Programs.
A sample of the letter: INVITATION TO CONSULT ON FEDERAL PROGRAMS Carroll County
Schools invites representatives of (Private School) to a consultation regarding your school's
participation in the following federally funded programs for the 2016-2017 school year.
Please review the list of programs, check one of items 1-3, and return this form to us
postmarked no later than (specified date). Title I, Part A: Improving Academic Achievement
of Disadvantaged Students Basic Programs Title II, Part A: Professional Development for
Teachers, Principals, and Others Title III, Part A: Language Instruction for Limited English
Proficient Title IV, Part A: Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Title V, Innovative
Programs and Parental Choice and Migrant Education. PLEASE CHECK AT LEAST ONE OF
THE OPTIONS BELOW. Yes, we will consult with the public school administrator regarding
our participation in one or more of the above programs. We understand that the
consultation(s) will be meaningful and substantial, and will cover many practical aspects of
operating federal programs. District has scheduled an initial consultation on at (Time) at
the Carroll County School Board Office. We can meet at the scheduled time and location.
The following person(s) will be present at the meeting: (Name) or No, we will not participate
in any of the programs listed above. I have additional questions. Please contact me via e-
35
mail address listed below or at the phone number listed below. (Email and Address)
(Signature of Authorized Private School Official Date) (Name of School Telephone Number).
22. Professional Learning and all federal programs
A description of the process the LEA will conduct annually to review and revise the
LEA Comprehensive Plan for Improving Student Academic Achievement.
Academic data are used to update the current Comprehensive Improvement Plan (CLIP) and
establish new or reaffirm existing targets for the upcoming school year. The system and
each school have Balanced Scorecards used to record and report achievement towards
stated goals. This data is entered electronically in the spring and the final scorecards are
usually ready for dissemination in August and are presented to the school board and the
press at the September meeting. Information from the Balanced Scorecards is also
presented annually at each of the Annual Report meetings held in the fall by all of the
schools (clustered by geographical areas) to the parents, community, and
stakeholders. The Balanced Scorecard includes longitudinal data. Color coded data makes
it very easy to identify performance targets and measure progress.
System data which includes students with disabilities and economically disadvantaged
subgroups are displayed in the Carroll County School Board Room for staff, parents,
community, and visitors to review. Each school displays its data in a prominent location
("data rooms") for staff, students, parents, and community members to review. System data
are also available to all stakeholders through the Annual Report and the system website.
Each year, the Director of Federal Programs will collaborate with the stakeholders
responsible for the various federal programs included in the LEA Comprehensive Plan in
order to review and revise the plan. The plan will be forwarded electronically to the federal
program stakeholders in order for them to determine if their specific descriptor responses
require revisions. Then, the Director of Federal Programs will convene a meeting with all
stakeholders and parents to review the descriptors and discuss the revisions to be made if
applicable. Prior to the submission of the plan, all stakeholders will have an opportunity to
review the LEA Comprehensive Plan. Other stakeholders to include the community and
parents are also provided an opportunity to review the Comprehensive LEA plan at the LEA
Annual Title I meeting and each of the school's required Annual Title I meeting. All Title I
parents within the school system are invited to attend a separate Title I Parent and
Stakeholder INPUT meeting to review and revise the CLIP in multiple ways to include the
local newspaper, radio station, schoolwide phone message through School Messenger, and
a posting on the system website. The invitations are distributed in other languages as
appropriate based upon our ESOL enrollment. The detailed agenda and sign-in sheet are
maintained at the district level by the Director of Federal Programs.
36
23. Title I, Part A; Title I, Part C
A description of how the LEA will provide supplemental support services for advocacy
and outreach activities for migratory children and their families, including informing
such children and families of, or helping such children and families gain access to,
other education, health, nutrition, and social services.
Carroll County Schools uses the Occupational Survey provided by the MEP Coordinator to
identify migrant students. This form/survey is located in the central registration office as
students enroll in the school system. For FY16, the Occupational Survey will distributed to
all students in the school system in each school's enrollment packets. Migrant students are
evaluated to determine appropriate academic placement. All migrant students are eligible
for Title I services and receive appropriate Title I services. If identified for additional
services, a referral is made to the individual school's Student Support Team or Gifted
facilitator for support. Specific activities to address the needs of migratory families are
provided. The Director of Federal Programs will schedule and have information available at
the schools concerning access to other educational, health, nutrition, and social services.
Parent outreach is provided in a language that is understood by the family, if
possible. Culture Connect is used for translation as well as private consultants when
needed. The system employs two bilingual ESOL teachers who interpret at parent meetings
held with parents and assists schools with translating documents as needed. In addition to
local services provided for migrant students, the school system will coordinate with the
MEP Consortium Staff at Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College (ABAC) to provide services
to eligible migrant participants.
24. Title I Part A; Title I, Part C
A description of how the LEA will promote interstate and intrastate coordination of
services for migratory children, including how the LEA will provide for educational
continuity through the timely transfer of pertinent school records, including
information on health, when children move from one school to another.
All students new to the Carroll County School system enroll in a centralized location
located at the central office. There is a "Registration Checklist" that includes information
needed from the parent/guardian at the time of registration. The checklist includes:
Previous school attended Proof of residency (Bill from electric, gas, water, or cable; Medicaid
Card, Lease/Rental agreement) Withdrawal form or report card (if applicable) Enrollment
Information Sheet (parent fills out/staff may assist) Homeless form Occupational Survey
Form (Migrant) Copy of parent's driver's license Copy of child's social security card Birth
Certificate (verify age) Ear, Eye, Dental (EED) Form 3300 Immunization Form 3231 Special
Needs (if applicable) and Was student in SST: The school registrar/counselor requests
student records and responds to other school systems when students transfers in a timely
manner.
37
25. Title I Part A; Title I, Part C
A description of how the LEA will identify and recruit eligible migrant families and
youth moving into or currently residing in the district.
As new students enroll through the Central Office registration, the Occupational Survey
Form is carefully reviewed to determine if a student should be referred to MEP. The surveys
are referred to the GADOE MEP Regional Office. ESOL teachers and other school staff are
trained to read birth certificates in other languages. All parents will be provided an
Occupational Survey Form to complete in order to identify eligible migrant families.
26. Professional Learning and all federal programs
A description of how the LEA will provide resources for the purpose of establishing
best practices that can be widely replicated throughout the LEA and with other LEAs
throughout the State and nation.
Strategies for establishing and sharing best practices include:
● Collaborative content planning teams (school-level and district-level)
● Creating common unit plans that are continually being developed among staff within
and collaboratively with other schools
● Implementing Google Groups for content sharing and questions across the system for
each grade level and subject area
● Include a notes section on all curriculum documents that gives teaching tips and
activities from our highest performing teachers to other teachers in the district
● Creation of a Literacy Framework for each grade level with reading, writing, listening,
and speaking expectations. This document provides expectations for across content
areas literacy.
● Utilizing system staff and external professional learning experts to work with teachers
to improve classroom instruction
● Conducting book study groups on relevant educational literature
● Conducting monthly cluster meetings with In-School Coordinators to support
teachers of SWD at the building level in instructional practices and support.
● Meetings bi-monthly with all special education teachers to provide support from
district level administration through the Exceptional Children's Services (ECS)
department to address best practices and compliance.
● Maintaining the ECS Google site for easy access to pertinent information regarding
Due Process, specialized programs and instructional resources.
● Encouraging teachers to share their ideas, implemented strategies, and results with
their building-level administrators, team members, faculties, and system level
personnel
● Evaluating pilot projects annually to determine whether and how to expand
exemplary concepts throughout the school system. This evaluation includes teacher,
administrator, student, and parent surveys; professional learning evaluations; and
cost analysis
The LEA will utilize best practices/strategies to address:
● Standards-based instruction, performance-based, and research-based instruction
● Effective tools to collect, manage, and analyze data
● Improved parental involvement and school-home communication
38
● Implement high-quality professional learning programs to increase teachers' skills of
teaching more effectively and engaging students
● Instructional practices critical for reducing the achievement gap
● Systemic implementation of acceleration (Previewing for ALL students in Grade Level
Subjects and Courses) (Previewing Key Vocabulary; scaffolding grade level
expectations)
Schoolwide instructional planning model based on the use of Learning Focused Strategies:
● Common lesson plans and unit plans
● Utilization of the SEATS lesson plan format
● Consistent pervasive use of research based instructional strategies consistent
inclusion of extending thinking activities
● Literacy framework
Reading comprehension focus--K - 12 in ALL subjects and courses:
● Teachers teach most common comprehension strategies as they assign reading
● Consistently focusing organizers and questions toward those common
comprehension strategies
● Increasing Lexile levels
Systemwide Writing across All Subjects:
● Consistent systemwide teaching of writing in literacy framework
● Writing across the curriculum
Strategies that most impact achievement:
● Extending thinking skills
● Summarizing
● Vocabulary in context
● Graphic organizers
● Non-verbal representations
● Provide Train the Trainer professional learning for re-delivery in standard-based,
performance-based, research-based instruction, and student progress monitoring
● Response to Intervention Implementation Training for Schools
● Projects and programs are evaluated annually to determine effectiveness and
expansion of exemplary concepts. Evaluation includes teacher, administrator,
student, and parent surveys. The evaluation also includes cost benefit analysis.
27. Title II, Part D; E-Rate
A description of how the LEA will take steps to ensure that all students and
teachers have increase access to technology. Include the strategies to be
implemented to increase or maintain access to technology and to establish or
maintain equitable technology access.
The school system plans to continue formulating online strategies to provide teachers,
students, and the community with access to information. Goals include the use of
electronic school board meetings (e-board) and an online parent portal for student
information. A call center message program (School Messenger) for emergency notification
and informational purposes is also used in the system to promote communication. The
school system uses a professional learning program that provides web-based class
registration and professional learning unit tracking for teachers and administrators. A
feature rich online human resources program is in place to more effectively receive and
39
process job applications. Ultimately, the system has begun to enrich classrooms across the
district with technology upgrades such as interactive boards, projectors, and mobile devices
for teacher and student use.
The district recognizes the importance of wireless networks in its facilities. Currently, all
schools are outfitted with wireless access that range from limited saturation at the
elementary schools to total saturation at the high schools. It is an ongoing project to reach
complete saturation at all of the schools.
Areas such as special education, ESOL, gifted, connections, and other elective courses are
given the same access to technology as other classrooms. In order to provide a free and
appropriate public education, special needs students have access to assistive technology
which is needed for them to access their curriculum in school, community and home
environments. If the required technology is not currently available, the school system is
committed to obtaining the required technology solutions.
An assessment of current curriculum will be conducted during the school year to ensure
that all technology curriculum indicators are included in the instructional program. Any
needed modifications will be implemented by the start of each school year.
A committee of professionals will review new software for district use. They will evaluate
and select software at age and skill appropriate levels in the content areas being
reviewed. Criteria for software selection includes instructional value, training of staff, ease
of use, cost, compatibility with current hardware, and adaptability to students of all levels
and abilities.
Instructional Uses of Technology
The Carroll County School System provides hardware and software necessary for students
to access their curriculum. Additionally, software and coursework to support online
learning and credit recovery is available for students. Tools such as Edgenuity, Georgia
Virtual School and Virtual High School are available for student use. Specific technology
needs for special education students and staff will continue to be met to provide one-on-one
access.

▪ All students have access to word prediction/text reader.
▪ Middle School and High School students with disabilities have access to stand alone
word processors.
▪ Students with physical disabilities have access to computer technology, notebook
computers and software that can be accessed across school and home environments
as appropriate.
▪ All students have access to an advanced reading aid through Kurzweil 3000.
▪ All students grade 5-12 have access to High Interest-Low Vocabulary reading
materials.
▪ Students who require alternate input devices have access to Touch Monitors,
Intellikeys Keyboards and switch access in order to use the computers in their
general education, special education and computer labs.
40
▪ Staff has access to Boardmaker, Picture This and other software solutions used in
developing appropriate activities and addressing student communication needs.
▪ Students have access to academic software.
▪ The Carroll County Assistive Technology Team maintains an inventory of assistive
devices, academic and learning aids which can be accessed by staff for individual
students and/or entire classes.
▪ All students who require Augmentative Alternative Communication will have access
to communication aids across school, community and home environments as needed.
▪ Special Education classrooms have availability of one-on-one access to word
processors and tablets to maximize instructional differentiation.
▪ Students have access to Co: Writer- word prediction, Write: Outloud -text to speech
software and DraftBuilder-outlining and webbing programs.
In order to provide a free and appropriate public education, students will have access to the
assistive technology which is required for them to access their curriculum in school,
community and home environments. If the required technology is not currently available
the school system is committed to obtaining the required technology solutions.
Administrative Uses of Technology
Hardware
● All system and school level administrators, counselors, media specialists and
secretaries have a modern computer and access to the system-wide personnel and
student data base with Internet access and e-mail.
Software
● Preferred administrative software is Microsoft Office.
● Student Information System from Infinite Campus is in place. A portal is utilized to
provide parents and students with web based access to student records and
information.
● Google Apps for Education is used for email, online storage, managed websites,
calendar, classroom management system and many other features.
● A managed firewall service and content filter is in place and maintained.
● An electronic board meeting program, E-board, is utilized to communicate with the
community and system staff.
Telecommunications
● All schools have telephone systems and fax lines with local and long distance service.
● A long range goal has been to use the fiber network for intersystem phone calls and
provide voice over IP service. This capability is currently in place in 100% of the
schools.
● System and school administrators have mobile devices for cellular and data services.
● A telephone messaging system is in place to notify parents of absences and important
school information.
Parent/Community Uses of Technology
Parents have access to the student portal so that they may monitor student grades and
attendance through Infinite Campus. The Carroll County Board of Education has
moved to E-Board technology in order to provide parent, community, and stakeholder
access to school system information. The school system website is provided and used
as a communication tool to access the aforementioned items as well as additional
information. All school websites are linked to the system website for easy access.
41
Websites are in place to provide teachers, students, and the community with access to
information. This includes online human resource applications, online survey
capabilities, and potential professional learning registration and tracking.
28. Title II, Part D; E-Rate
A description of the LEA's long-term strategies for financing technology to ensure
that all students, teachers, and classrooms have access to technology, technical
support, and instructional support.
The technology department will maintain a wide area network interconnected by fiber and
delivering Internet access to each classroom. A campus wide wireless network will be
provided to enhance learning opportunities both inside and outside the classroom.
Outdated computers will be replaced and computer labs will be maintained to support the
curriculum of the school system. The technology department will provide and maintain a
system firewall, content filter, and virus protection measures to protect our users and
information. Funding sources include state and local funds, E-Rate funds, SPLOST funds,
and grant funds.
The Coordinator of Instructional Supports will continue working with schools,
administrators and teachers to provide "Just in Time" training focused on increasing
student engagement and performance. The Chief Technology Officer will work closely with
the Teaching and Learning Department to ensure administrators, teachers and students
have the technology resources needed to produce globally competitive, college and career
ready graduates. They will present new ideas at principals meetings, offer training during
scheduled professional development sessions and provide guidance and assistance with the
implementation of technology in the classroom on a daily basis. The Coordinator of
Instructional Supports will also provide training to all media specialists in the county once
a month providing them with resources and ideas to redeliver at their respective schools.